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Plague Ports: The Global Urban Impact of Bubonic Plague, 1894–1901 (review)

Plague Ports: The Global Urban Impact of Bubonic Plague, 1894–1901 (review) Book Reviews the remaining chapters, and their lives do help the reader "to imagine a hundred horizons, not one, of many hues and colors" (p. 4). Outside of a well-meaning but ultimately unconvincing side discussion warning the American empire of the tragedies of past imperialist projects, Bose stays in the area he knows best: the "historical space that intermediates between the levels of nation and globe" (p. 3). He calls his effort "a contribution to global history and, at the same time, a cautionary tale against its recent excesses," defining the latter as "that historical version of global integration that hastily robs such interregional arenas as the Indian Ocean rim of any real meaning" (p. 272). This self-framing notwithstanding, Bose rarely argues against too global or too local approaches, in their place offering what the lives of his circular migrants tell us about the Indian Ocean arena from 1800 to 1970. What he finds there will make transnational or world historians muse about their own fields, but it is Indian Ocean scholars, and primarily South Asianists among them, who will benefit the most. In the book's strongest moments, Bose extends the connective history of the Indian Ocean world http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Plague Ports: The Global Urban Impact of Bubonic Plague, 1894–1901 (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 18 (3) – Nov 7, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews the remaining chapters, and their lives do help the reader "to imagine a hundred horizons, not one, of many hues and colors" (p. 4). Outside of a well-meaning but ultimately unconvincing side discussion warning the American empire of the tragedies of past imperialist projects, Bose stays in the area he knows best: the "historical space that intermediates between the levels of nation and globe" (p. 3). He calls his effort "a contribution to global history and, at the same time, a cautionary tale against its recent excesses," defining the latter as "that historical version of global integration that hastily robs such interregional arenas as the Indian Ocean rim of any real meaning" (p. 272). This self-framing notwithstanding, Bose rarely argues against too global or too local approaches, in their place offering what the lives of his circular migrants tell us about the Indian Ocean arena from 1800 to 1970. What he finds there will make transnational or world historians muse about their own fields, but it is Indian Ocean scholars, and primarily South Asianists among them, who will benefit the most. In the book's strongest moments, Bose extends the connective history of the Indian Ocean world

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 7, 2007

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