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Persian Christians at the Chinese Court: The Xi'an Stele and the Early Medieval Church of the East by R. Todd Godwin (review)

Persian Christians at the Chinese Court: The Xi'an Stele and the Early Medieval Church of... 358 China Review International: Vol. 23, No. 4, 2016 (e.g., attributive form). Sometimes classical forms are simply defined in the vocabulary lists like any other word; for example, awasekangau 併せ考う is explained as a verb meaning “to consider together” (p. 320), but I think it might be helpful to explain that this is the classical equivalent of the modern form awasekangaeru 併せ考える. Or, when Yoshikawa Kojiro uses the term kiokusaru 記憶さる, the coauthors write that this means “to be remembered (る indicates passive voice; common derivative of conventional form 記憶せらる)” (p. 238). This is all true, but supplying the modern equivalent 記憶される would be more intelligible to the book’s target readers than offering a second classical construction as the “conventional” form. Of course, detailed consideration of classical Japanese grammar is beyond the scope of this book, but a bit more bridge-building on this point, including specific reference to other textbooks, would be helpful. Fogel and Joo’s textbook is an impressive effort that succeeds in its goal of facilitating the Sinologist’s transition from intermediate to advanced reading proficiency. A reader who works through its eight selections will be exposed to a wide range of linguistic and rhetorical styles, will have http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Persian Christians at the Chinese Court: The Xi'an Stele and the Early Medieval Church of the East by R. Todd Godwin (review)

China Review International , Volume 23 (4) – Dec 5, 2018

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

358 China Review International: Vol. 23, No. 4, 2016 (e.g., attributive form). Sometimes classical forms are simply defined in the vocabulary lists like any other word; for example, awasekangau 併せ考う is explained as a verb meaning “to consider together” (p. 320), but I think it might be helpful to explain that this is the classical equivalent of the modern form awasekangaeru 併せ考える. Or, when Yoshikawa Kojiro uses the term kiokusaru 記憶さる, the coauthors write that this means “to be remembered (る indicates passive voice; common derivative of conventional form 記憶せらる)” (p. 238). This is all true, but supplying the modern equivalent 記憶される would be more intelligible to the book’s target readers than offering a second classical construction as the “conventional” form. Of course, detailed consideration of classical Japanese grammar is beyond the scope of this book, but a bit more bridge-building on this point, including specific reference to other textbooks, would be helpful. Fogel and Joo’s textbook is an impressive effort that succeeds in its goal of facilitating the Sinologist’s transition from intermediate to advanced reading proficiency. A reader who works through its eight selections will be exposed to a wide range of linguistic and rhetorical styles, will have

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 5, 2018

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