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Performing Asian Transnationalisms: Theatre, Identity, and the Geographies of Performance by Amanda Rogers (review)

Performing Asian Transnationalisms: Theatre, Identity, and the Geographies of Performance by... 528 Reviews Mitra’s conclusion outlines the ways in which Dust (2014) dismantles ballet’s elitist association and contemporizes the form. A collaboration with the renowned ballerina Tamara Rojo, this piece began in “darkness to illumi- nate gradually with a spotlight at the center stage, a hunched over inhuman figure appears . . . the writhing body . . . is contracted, alienated in and by its own embodied trauma,” which is then “followed by a line of figures stepping into light. . . . The silence is broken with claps and releasing dust from their fists” (p. 163). This metaphor of dust is “a process of self-renewal and releas- ing old skin to allow a new life to emerge” (p. 164). Mitra suggests a feminist reading of Dust as Khan’s intervention to ballet (p. 165). Khan’s contribution to contemporary dance is significant; however, Mitra’s amplified claim is that Khan “altered” (p. 168) the landscape of global dance, which may deny past, contemporary, and future explorations by other artists across the globe. This book will be of high interest to those who seek a revised and alternate rethinking of interculturalism across South Asian dia- sporic performing arts. It throws light on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Performing Asian Transnationalisms: Theatre, Identity, and the Geographies of Performance by Amanda Rogers (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 33 (2) – Aug 9, 2016

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109

Abstract

528 Reviews Mitra’s conclusion outlines the ways in which Dust (2014) dismantles ballet’s elitist association and contemporizes the form. A collaboration with the renowned ballerina Tamara Rojo, this piece began in “darkness to illumi- nate gradually with a spotlight at the center stage, a hunched over inhuman figure appears . . . the writhing body . . . is contracted, alienated in and by its own embodied trauma,” which is then “followed by a line of figures stepping into light. . . . The silence is broken with claps and releasing dust from their fists” (p. 163). This metaphor of dust is “a process of self-renewal and releas- ing old skin to allow a new life to emerge” (p. 164). Mitra suggests a feminist reading of Dust as Khan’s intervention to ballet (p. 165). Khan’s contribution to contemporary dance is significant; however, Mitra’s amplified claim is that Khan “altered” (p. 168) the landscape of global dance, which may deny past, contemporary, and future explorations by other artists across the globe. This book will be of high interest to those who seek a revised and alternate rethinking of interculturalism across South Asian dia- sporic performing arts. It throws light on

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 9, 2016

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