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Parmenides’ and Śaṅkara’s Nondual Being without Not-being

Parmenides’ and Śaṅkara’s Nondual Being without Not-being Abstract: This essay explores the similarities in the thought of the Greek philosopher Parmenides (fifth century b.c.e .) and that of the Indian philosopher Śaṅkara (eighth to ninth centuries c.e .). Parmenides’ being is compared to the nonduality of Brahman and ātman , as defended by Sankara. The focus is especially on the methods used by both philosophers to help readers know nondual reality. First, they both make a distinction ( krísis/viveka ) between being (real, Self) and not-being (unreal, Non-self); and second, starting from this distinction, they both test, by means of negative dialectic, what, according to common sense, are the fundamental characteristics of reality. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Parmenides’ and Śaṅkara’s Nondual Being without Not-being

Philosophy East and West , Volume 66 (1) – Jan 28, 2016

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: This essay explores the similarities in the thought of the Greek philosopher Parmenides (fifth century b.c.e .) and that of the Indian philosopher Śaṅkara (eighth to ninth centuries c.e .). Parmenides’ being is compared to the nonduality of Brahman and ātman , as defended by Sankara. The focus is especially on the methods used by both philosophers to help readers know nondual reality. First, they both make a distinction ( krísis/viveka ) between being (real, Self) and not-being (unreal, Non-self); and second, starting from this distinction, they both test, by means of negative dialectic, what, according to common sense, are the fundamental characteristics of reality.

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 28, 2016

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