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Palauans and Guest Workers: An Opinion Paper

Palauans and Guest Workers: An Opinion Paper Sandra S Pierantozzi Ever since Captain Wilson was shipwrecked on Ulong Reef foreigners have continued to visit the islands of Palau for one purpose or another. The most recent influx of foreigners to Palau has consisted of guest workers. The 1995 census put the number of guest workers and their dependents at 4,717, and Labor Office statistics showed 5,171 as of April 1998 (CoPopChi 1997, 1). With a total population of slightly over 17,225 in 1995, this represents an appreciable portion of Palau's residents (Anastacio 1998). The large and growing number of guest workers in Palau is raising a great deal of concern among indigenous Palauans, who for the most part are beginning to feel crowded and alienated in their own islands. It also raises a range of important issues that must be addressed if Palau is to get a grip on its long-run economic and political development. Nevertheless, indigenous Palauans are cognizant of the advantages of a large workforce, some of which are discussed here. Palau is following a trend in infrastructure development experienced first in Guam and more recently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. This construction boom, fueled by an expanding tourism industry, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Palauans and Guest Workers: An Opinion Paper

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 12 (2) – Jul 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

Sandra S Pierantozzi Ever since Captain Wilson was shipwrecked on Ulong Reef foreigners have continued to visit the islands of Palau for one purpose or another. The most recent influx of foreigners to Palau has consisted of guest workers. The 1995 census put the number of guest workers and their dependents at 4,717, and Labor Office statistics showed 5,171 as of April 1998 (CoPopChi 1997, 1). With a total population of slightly over 17,225 in 1995, this represents an appreciable portion of Palau's residents (Anastacio 1998). The large and growing number of guest workers in Palau is raising a great deal of concern among indigenous Palauans, who for the most part are beginning to feel crowded and alienated in their own islands. It also raises a range of important issues that must be addressed if Palau is to get a grip on its long-run economic and political development. Nevertheless, indigenous Palauans are cognizant of the advantages of a large workforce, some of which are discussed here. Palau is following a trend in infrastructure development experienced first in Guam and more recently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. This construction boom, fueled by an expanding tourism industry,

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 1, 2000

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