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Palau

Palau political reviews · micronesia tions decided to continue to employ Jack Abramoff, lobbyist for the commonwealth, to try to block such legislation in Washington dc . Kuartei, Senator Santos Olikong, and newcomer Ben Roberto, the former governor of Angaur State. In July 2000, Nakamura finally announced that his "anointed one" was none other than Vice President Remengesau. This gave a significant boost to Remengesau's efforts, in addition to his vigorous campaigning, which involved a great deal of travel and grassroots contact. With 70 percent of the Palau electorate turning out for the primary, Remengesau came out on top, taking nearly 4,000 votes (43 percent) of the 9,221 cast. The second-place finisher, Senator Sugiyama, garnered 2,050 votes, or 22 percent of the total. Sugiyama had supported Nakamura throughout his tenure in office and was disappointed that the outgoing president had not thrown his political weight behind such a longtime, loyal supporter. After his defeat in the primary, Sugiyama redoubled his efforts and gained the support of the other three losers, who signed a contract pledging mutual support. Sugiyama recognized that if he could get a major share of their supporters and a reasonable portion of the electorate who had http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

political reviews · micronesia tions decided to continue to employ Jack Abramoff, lobbyist for the commonwealth, to try to block such legislation in Washington dc . Kuartei, Senator Santos Olikong, and newcomer Ben Roberto, the former governor of Angaur State. In July 2000, Nakamura finally announced that his "anointed one" was none other than Vice President Remengesau. This gave a significant boost to Remengesau's efforts, in addition to his vigorous campaigning, which involved a great deal of travel and grassroots contact. With 70 percent of the Palau electorate turning out for the primary, Remengesau came out on top, taking nearly 4,000 votes (43 percent) of the 9,221 cast. The second-place finisher, Senator Sugiyama, garnered 2,050 votes, or 22 percent of the total. Sugiyama had supported Nakamura throughout his tenure in office and was disappointed that the outgoing president had not thrown his political weight behind such a longtime, loyal supporter. After his defeat in the primary, Sugiyama redoubled his efforts and gained the support of the other three losers, who signed a contract pledging mutual support. Sugiyama recognized that if he could get a major share of their supporters and a reasonable portion of the electorate who had

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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