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Pacific Futures (review)

Pacific Futures (review) the contemporary pacific · 19:2 (2007) tions: Political instability will continue until Pacific countries develop their own political systems; alarmist forecasts by impatient neoliberal economic "missionaries" and "one-size-fits-all" governance advocates will probably be counterproductive (Henderson). Indigenous systems will be able to adjust well to political and economic challenges (Teaiwa and Koloamatangi)-- particularly where, as in Sämoa, indigenous institutions show great durability (So`o). Nevertheless, new forces of economic globalization will continue to cause trepidation among traditionalists (Madraiwiwi). Laws will be most successful when they are based on broad participation rather than on model laws ("insert name of country here") or regional resolutions that are not successfully implemented (Kuemlangan). All these chapters are consistent with one another in viewing indigenous foundations as essential for successful development in the future, but they would be better if they expanded on exactly what this will mean in specific and practical terms. Part Two, "Social and Economic Challenges," consists of seven chapters, making the following diverse predictions: Pacific languages are extremely vulnerable and parents will play a crucial role in preserving them by speaking the languages with their children at home (Hunkin and Mayer). Current and prospective trade policies will have important consequences (Narsey). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Pacific Futures (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 19 (2) – Aug 13, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 19:2 (2007) tions: Political instability will continue until Pacific countries develop their own political systems; alarmist forecasts by impatient neoliberal economic "missionaries" and "one-size-fits-all" governance advocates will probably be counterproductive (Henderson). Indigenous systems will be able to adjust well to political and economic challenges (Teaiwa and Koloamatangi)-- particularly where, as in Sämoa, indigenous institutions show great durability (So`o). Nevertheless, new forces of economic globalization will continue to cause trepidation among traditionalists (Madraiwiwi). Laws will be most successful when they are based on broad participation rather than on model laws ("insert name of country here") or regional resolutions that are not successfully implemented (Kuemlangan). All these chapters are consistent with one another in viewing indigenous foundations as essential for successful development in the future, but they would be better if they expanded on exactly what this will mean in specific and practical terms. Part Two, "Social and Economic Challenges," consists of seven chapters, making the following diverse predictions: Pacific languages are extremely vulnerable and parents will play a crucial role in preserving them by speaking the languages with their children at home (Hunkin and Mayer). Current and prospective trade policies will have important consequences (Narsey).

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 13, 2007

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