Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Out of Notebooks

Out of Notebooks W. S . D I P I E R O In Varieties of Religious Experience, William James says that the life of religion consists of the belief "that there is an unseen order, and that our supreme good lies in harmoniously adjusting ourselves thereto." Much poetry, however, comes out of the process of failing to so adjust, or of the torment and struggle to adjust, the dissonance and raucousness of the work of it. I believe a poet's task is to tell the struggle, to attempt to reveal the order or our dream of it. Poetry that convincingly and freshly declares knowledge of that harmony or makes sweet music of that agreement is very rare. Thomas Traherne and Henry Vaughan do it. Such poetry may be a little superfluous, for who needs to have represented what has been so supremely experienced? To satisfy religious desire, Gerard Manley Hopkins turned language itself into a kind of gigantomachy. In a certain Australian tribe, boys about to be initiated are taken from their mothers by masked men, carried outside the village, made to lie on the ground, and then covered entirely with sticks and branches. They are "buried" in order to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

Out of Notebooks

Manoa , Volume 23 (2) – Mar 16, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/out-of-notebooks-lJPDI0WrIV
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

W. S . D I P I E R O In Varieties of Religious Experience, William James says that the life of religion consists of the belief "that there is an unseen order, and that our supreme good lies in harmoniously adjusting ourselves thereto." Much poetry, however, comes out of the process of failing to so adjust, or of the torment and struggle to adjust, the dissonance and raucousness of the work of it. I believe a poet's task is to tell the struggle, to attempt to reveal the order or our dream of it. Poetry that convincingly and freshly declares knowledge of that harmony or makes sweet music of that agreement is very rare. Thomas Traherne and Henry Vaughan do it. Such poetry may be a little superfluous, for who needs to have represented what has been so supremely experienced? To satisfy religious desire, Gerard Manley Hopkins turned language itself into a kind of gigantomachy. In a certain Australian tribe, boys about to be initiated are taken from their mothers by masked men, carried outside the village, made to lie on the ground, and then covered entirely with sticks and branches. They are "buried" in order to

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 16, 2011

There are no references for this article.