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Opening Remarks of Welcome

Opening Remarks of Welcome 02-King_xvi-xviii 4/13/05 8:10 AM Page xvi AMBROSE KING VICE-CHANCELLOR OF THE CHINESE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG Friends, good morning. On behalf of the Chinese University of Hong Kong I have great pleasure in welcoming you all to our campus for this fourth International Autobiography and Biography Association conference. Let me begin with a quotation: No one I know lives in the house where they grew up or even in the town or vil- lage where they once were children. Most of my friends live apart from their par- ents. Many were born in one country and now live in another. Others live in exile, forming their thoughts in a second language among strangers. . . . This century has made migration, expatriation and exile the norm, rootedness the exception. These words were written by the Russian-Canadian writer Michael Ignatieff in his memoir The Russian Album, first published in 1988. Are “migration, expatriation and exile the norm” in the world today, and “rootedness the exception”? Perhaps not. But for the majority of people who are today driv- en to write the story of their lives, Ignatieff ’s statement may be right. If it is, then that has very profound implications http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

Opening Remarks of Welcome

Biography , Volume 28 (1) – Jun 15, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Biographical Research Center.
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

02-King_xvi-xviii 4/13/05 8:10 AM Page xvi AMBROSE KING VICE-CHANCELLOR OF THE CHINESE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG Friends, good morning. On behalf of the Chinese University of Hong Kong I have great pleasure in welcoming you all to our campus for this fourth International Autobiography and Biography Association conference. Let me begin with a quotation: No one I know lives in the house where they grew up or even in the town or vil- lage where they once were children. Most of my friends live apart from their par- ents. Many were born in one country and now live in another. Others live in exile, forming their thoughts in a second language among strangers. . . . This century has made migration, expatriation and exile the norm, rootedness the exception. These words were written by the Russian-Canadian writer Michael Ignatieff in his memoir The Russian Album, first published in 1988. Are “migration, expatriation and exile the norm” in the world today, and “rootedness the exception”? Perhaps not. But for the majority of people who are today driv- en to write the story of their lives, Ignatieff ’s statement may be right. If it is, then that has very profound implications

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 15, 2005

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