On Trans-Saharan Trails: Islamic Law, Trade Networks, and Cross-Cultural Exchange in Nineteenth-Century Western Africa (review)

On Trans-Saharan Trails: Islamic Law, Trade Networks, and Cross-Cultural Exchange in... journal of world history, september 2011 Scott, who discovered that the emergence of coolie labor helped extend the plantation system and the institution of slavery beyond the period in which it should have ended earlier and with the termination of the African slave trade in the mid 1860s. Finally, her analysis balances the work of Manuel Moreno Fraginals, who demonstrated that although the coolies were treated like slaves, they were salaried workers. As a result, they assisted in the process that led to the use of free wage earners in the sugar industry by the end of the nineteenth century. Yet, Yun failed to underline that Cuban officials and planters were initially dissatisfied with the quality of coolie laborers. This perception caused them to end the Asian trade while they sought to recruit other types of immigrant workers from Mexico, Spain, and the Canary Islands until 1853. Only when they failed to locate an alternate source of cheap labor did the Asian workers look attractive to the plantocracy. Yun also understated that the coolie trade and their subsequent treatment were engendered by the decline of the African slave trade. It was only after 1865 that a large number http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

On Trans-Saharan Trails: Islamic Law, Trade Networks, and Cross-Cultural Exchange in Nineteenth-Century Western Africa (review)

Journal of World History, Volume 22 (3) – Sep 4, 2011

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-8050
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Abstract

journal of world history, september 2011 Scott, who discovered that the emergence of coolie labor helped extend the plantation system and the institution of slavery beyond the period in which it should have ended earlier and with the termination of the African slave trade in the mid 1860s. Finally, her analysis balances the work of Manuel Moreno Fraginals, who demonstrated that although the coolies were treated like slaves, they were salaried workers. As a result, they assisted in the process that led to the use of free wage earners in the sugar industry by the end of the nineteenth century. Yet, Yun failed to underline that Cuban officials and planters were initially dissatisfied with the quality of coolie laborers. This perception caused them to end the Asian trade while they sought to recruit other types of immigrant workers from Mexico, Spain, and the Canary Islands until 1853. Only when they failed to locate an alternate source of cheap labor did the Asian workers look attractive to the plantocracy. Yun also understated that the coolie trade and their subsequent treatment were engendered by the decline of the African slave trade. It was only after 1865 that a large number

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 4, 2011

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