Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

On the Lecture Circuit with Gertrude Stein's Portraits

On the Lecture Circuit with Gertrude Stein's Portraits <p>Abstract:</p><p>This essay intervenes in recent scholarship on modernism and celebrity that treats fame as a unidirectional performance by emphasizing the extent to which Gertrude Stein&apos;s celebrity is the product of external artifice: particularly, the invocation of preexisting social types drawn from mass culture and circulated by publishers and promoters eager to market Stein to an audience expecting a very specific model of (feminine) success. Having become a best seller in no small part due to its "gossipy" look into the glamorous world of the Parisian art movement, <i>The Autobiography of Alice B</i>. Toklas transformed Stein into a bona fide star. But while Stein had actively courted commercial success, her first taste of celebrity came with a discomfiting loss of control. With so many people eager to "know" her, Stein felt her own sense of self slipping away. By pairing critical analysis of Stein&apos;s own thoughts on celebrity with her often-overlooked <i>Lectures in America</i>, I argue that Stein&apos;s lectures, presented as they were to audiences expecting the same "gossipy" depictions they received in the autobiography, are not only a subversion of the expectations associated with fame but a frank depiction of its failures, a self-conscious demonstration of the artifice of celebrity.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

On the Lecture Circuit with Gertrude Stein&apos;s Portraits

Biography , Volume 40 (3) – Nov 22, 2017

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/on-the-lecture-circuit-with-gertrude-stein-apos-s-portraits-sJqKO1JF5J
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Biographical Research Center
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>This essay intervenes in recent scholarship on modernism and celebrity that treats fame as a unidirectional performance by emphasizing the extent to which Gertrude Stein&apos;s celebrity is the product of external artifice: particularly, the invocation of preexisting social types drawn from mass culture and circulated by publishers and promoters eager to market Stein to an audience expecting a very specific model of (feminine) success. Having become a best seller in no small part due to its "gossipy" look into the glamorous world of the Parisian art movement, <i>The Autobiography of Alice B</i>. Toklas transformed Stein into a bona fide star. But while Stein had actively courted commercial success, her first taste of celebrity came with a discomfiting loss of control. With so many people eager to "know" her, Stein felt her own sense of self slipping away. By pairing critical analysis of Stein&apos;s own thoughts on celebrity with her often-overlooked <i>Lectures in America</i>, I argue that Stein&apos;s lectures, presented as they were to audiences expecting the same "gossipy" depictions they received in the autobiography, are not only a subversion of the expectations associated with fame but a frank depiction of its failures, a self-conscious demonstration of the artifice of celebrity.</p>

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 22, 2017

There are no references for this article.