Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

On the Epistemology of the Senses in Early Chinese Thought (review)

On the Epistemology of the Senses in Early Chinese Thought (review) position, and to his ``pleasure of speaking'' (p. 218). Wang especially points out that Derrida's account of the Same as the truth of the sign is ``resonant with the Buddhist conception of the samata as the true sign of all factors'' (ibid.). There are lots more Å comparisons of the two throughout this chapter and the entire book. Although Wang focuses on Derrida's early writings, his reading of Derrida's texts is meticulous and accurate. While avoiding the identification of Derrida with Madhyamika and other Å Buddhist writers, and paying close attention to their differences, Wang ends up with a clear message that Maha Å na Buddhist deconstruction anticipates Derrida's stratÅya egy and style. This kind of comparative approach is interesting. Most comparisons of Derrida and Buddhism prior to Wang's book start with an outline of Derrida's thought and then turn to Buddhist texts to discuss their similarities with the former. Wang's work deviates from this common way of comparison. It borrows certain terms and gets certain inspirations from Derridean deconstruction, but focuses on exploring the critical potential of a set of Buddhist texts. It discovers a deconstructive pattern from these Buddhist texts and then uses it as a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

On the Epistemology of the Senses in Early Chinese Thought (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 55 (3) – Jul 7, 2005

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/on-the-epistemology-of-the-senses-in-early-chinese-thought-review-8RB8yzNpQS
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

position, and to his ``pleasure of speaking'' (p. 218). Wang especially points out that Derrida's account of the Same as the truth of the sign is ``resonant with the Buddhist conception of the samata as the true sign of all factors'' (ibid.). There are lots more Å comparisons of the two throughout this chapter and the entire book. Although Wang focuses on Derrida's early writings, his reading of Derrida's texts is meticulous and accurate. While avoiding the identification of Derrida with Madhyamika and other Å Buddhist writers, and paying close attention to their differences, Wang ends up with a clear message that Maha Å na Buddhist deconstruction anticipates Derrida's stratÅya egy and style. This kind of comparative approach is interesting. Most comparisons of Derrida and Buddhism prior to Wang's book start with an outline of Derrida's thought and then turn to Buddhist texts to discuss their similarities with the former. Wang's work deviates from this common way of comparison. It borrows certain terms and gets certain inspirations from Derridean deconstruction, but focuses on exploring the critical potential of a set of Buddhist texts. It discovers a deconstructive pattern from these Buddhist texts and then uses it as a

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 7, 2005

There are no references for this article.