Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

On the Classification of Kenyah and Kayanic Languages

On the Classification of Kenyah and Kayanic Languages Abstract: Borneo has been described by Blust as a “hot spot” for linguistic change. The densely forested highlands and river systems are home to numerous communities, and a long history of human occupation has created a complex network of languages and dialects. Recently, Borneo has been the focus of numerous comparative works, many dealing with the Kenyah, Kayanic, Penan, and Sebop language groups of Sarawak and East Kalimantan. This paper addresses the Kayan-Kenyah hypothesis of Antonia Soriente. By carefully considering the linguistic evidence, it is shown that Soriente’s hypothesis does not provide a convincing argument for a Kayan-Kenyah subgroup. Rather, there is a significant body of evidence for assuming that Kenyah, Penan, and Sebop form a single subgroup that does not include Kayanic. Furthermore, Soriente’s Kayan-Kenyah hypothesis includes an internal subgrouping that places many demonstrably Kenyah languages within the Kayanic subgroup. This paper also addresses these issues, and proposes an updated internal subgrouping based largely on the regular and highly distinctive split in Proto-Austronesian voiced stops shared by all Kenyah, Penan, and Sebop languages. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

On the Classification of Kenyah and Kayanic Languages

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 54 (2) – Nov 23, 2015

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/on-the-classification-of-kenyah-and-kayanic-languages-Ij0LprepHW
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9421
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: Borneo has been described by Blust as a “hot spot” for linguistic change. The densely forested highlands and river systems are home to numerous communities, and a long history of human occupation has created a complex network of languages and dialects. Recently, Borneo has been the focus of numerous comparative works, many dealing with the Kenyah, Kayanic, Penan, and Sebop language groups of Sarawak and East Kalimantan. This paper addresses the Kayan-Kenyah hypothesis of Antonia Soriente. By carefully considering the linguistic evidence, it is shown that Soriente’s hypothesis does not provide a convincing argument for a Kayan-Kenyah subgroup. Rather, there is a significant body of evidence for assuming that Kenyah, Penan, and Sebop form a single subgroup that does not include Kayanic. Furthermore, Soriente’s Kayan-Kenyah hypothesis includes an internal subgrouping that places many demonstrably Kenyah languages within the Kayanic subgroup. This paper also addresses these issues, and proposes an updated internal subgrouping based largely on the regular and highly distinctive split in Proto-Austronesian voiced stops shared by all Kenyah, Penan, and Sebop languages.

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 23, 2015

There are no references for this article.