Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

On Analogies: Rethinking the Pacific in a Global Context

On Analogies: Rethinking the Pacific in a Global Context On Analogies: Rethinking the Pacific in a Global Context Teresia K Teaiwa This paper began its life as a keynote address at the July 2002 meeting of the European Society of Oceanists in Vienna, Austria. Let us imagine a small but significant number of European—that is, Europe-based—scholars earnestly at work on Pacific topics in scattered, isolated locations on that turbulent continent. There is a certain exoticness to that image, and a pathos with which I, at least, can identify, having myself spent many years studying the Pacific away from the Pacific. In a funny way, the very existence of a “European Society for Oceanists” mir- rors the enduring image of the Pacific region as being constituted by small, scattered, isolated islands— despite Epeli Hau‘ofa’s best efforts (Hau‘ofa 1993). In my imagination these Europe-based scholars are surrounded by col- leagues examining national and domestic issues, European Union devel- opments, nato politics, events in the transition states of the former Soviet Union, peacekeeping and reconstruction in the Balkans, the resurgence of right-wing political parties, or, as the occasion may call for, the legacy of philosophers like Karl Popper and the challenges of housing in the twenty- first century. Some of their http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

On Analogies: Rethinking the Pacific in a Global Context

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 18 (1) – Dec 6, 2005

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/on-analogies-rethinking-the-pacific-in-a-global-context-FipyS60TcY
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464

Abstract

On Analogies: Rethinking the Pacific in a Global Context Teresia K Teaiwa This paper began its life as a keynote address at the July 2002 meeting of the European Society of Oceanists in Vienna, Austria. Let us imagine a small but significant number of European—that is, Europe-based—scholars earnestly at work on Pacific topics in scattered, isolated locations on that turbulent continent. There is a certain exoticness to that image, and a pathos with which I, at least, can identify, having myself spent many years studying the Pacific away from the Pacific. In a funny way, the very existence of a “European Society for Oceanists” mir- rors the enduring image of the Pacific region as being constituted by small, scattered, isolated islands— despite Epeli Hau‘ofa’s best efforts (Hau‘ofa 1993). In my imagination these Europe-based scholars are surrounded by col- leagues examining national and domestic issues, European Union devel- opments, nato politics, events in the transition states of the former Soviet Union, peacekeeping and reconstruction in the Balkans, the resurgence of right-wing political parties, or, as the occasion may call for, the legacy of philosophers like Karl Popper and the challenges of housing in the twenty- first century. Some of their

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 6, 2005

There are no references for this article.