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Ogyū Sorai’s Philosophical Masterworks: The Bendō and Benmei (review)

Ogyū Sorai’s Philosophical Masterworks: The Bendō and Benmei (review) Western philosopher of science should pause to consider how culturally constrained he or she has been. The final chapter is ``Knowledge, Truth and Language.'' Here Sarukkai demonstrates two things: the huge influence of grammar on Indian logic on the one hand, and, on the other, the curious mixture of formal mathematics and linguistic analysis that has obtained in the West in the study of the philosophy of science, especially in the last century or so. Throughout most of the text, Sarukkai avoids entangling the reader in the finer points of division that are a distinctive feature of classical Indian logic, while subtly persuading the reader to rethink his or her approach to scientific theories and experiments. There is a serious question as to how far it is possible, and also how productive it is, to pursue the philosophy of science using the Indian style to the nth degree, but this book is a refreshingly non-polemical introduction to thinking across cultures-- something from which we all can benefit. Ogyu Sorai's Philosophical Masterworks: The Bendo and Benmei. By John A. ¯ ¯ Tucker. Honolulu: Association for Asian Studies and the University of Hawai`i Press, 2006. Pp. 496. Hardcover $56.00. Reviewed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Ogyū Sorai’s Philosophical Masterworks: The Bendō and Benmei (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 59 (4) – Oct 25, 2009

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1529-1898
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Abstract

Western philosopher of science should pause to consider how culturally constrained he or she has been. The final chapter is ``Knowledge, Truth and Language.'' Here Sarukkai demonstrates two things: the huge influence of grammar on Indian logic on the one hand, and, on the other, the curious mixture of formal mathematics and linguistic analysis that has obtained in the West in the study of the philosophy of science, especially in the last century or so. Throughout most of the text, Sarukkai avoids entangling the reader in the finer points of division that are a distinctive feature of classical Indian logic, while subtly persuading the reader to rethink his or her approach to scientific theories and experiments. There is a serious question as to how far it is possible, and also how productive it is, to pursue the philosophy of science using the Indian style to the nth degree, but this book is a refreshingly non-polemical introduction to thinking across cultures-- something from which we all can benefit. Ogyu Sorai's Philosophical Masterworks: The Bendo and Benmei. By John A. ¯ ¯ Tucker. Honolulu: Association for Asian Studies and the University of Hawai`i Press, 2006. Pp. 496. Hardcover $56.00. Reviewed

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 25, 2009

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