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¡Nunca Más!

¡Nunca Más! P R O L O G U E ¡Nunca Más! Saturday The plane to Kraków is held forty minutes at the gate in Paris, but the delay does not distress me. No one is waiting for me in Kraków. My plan is to work alone and anonymously there, having spent the last five days in Paris with colleagues. I have not discussed what I've planned in Poland with anyone, because I do not know what I am doing. For the hundredth time I am going somewhere with the simplest of ideas, trusting to an intuition driven by desires that have compelled my life as a writer and which, sooner or later, I act on. This time it is just to look at Auschwitz. I have been visiting slaughter grounds in my own country over the past year, places where Native Americans were killed without warning by racists and the many and various acolytes of Progress, acts of genocide in which my government was either directly involved or complicitous. Auschwitz, it is my hope, will clarify something for me, even if it is only the barest glimmer of comprehension about how such murderous enforcements of policy can occur. What http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

¡Nunca Más!

Manoa , Volume 20 (1) – Jun 20, 2008

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press
ISSN
1527-943x
Publisher site
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Abstract

P R O L O G U E ¡Nunca Más! Saturday The plane to Kraków is held forty minutes at the gate in Paris, but the delay does not distress me. No one is waiting for me in Kraków. My plan is to work alone and anonymously there, having spent the last five days in Paris with colleagues. I have not discussed what I've planned in Poland with anyone, because I do not know what I am doing. For the hundredth time I am going somewhere with the simplest of ideas, trusting to an intuition driven by desires that have compelled my life as a writer and which, sooner or later, I act on. This time it is just to look at Auschwitz. I have been visiting slaughter grounds in my own country over the past year, places where Native Americans were killed without warning by racists and the many and various acolytes of Progress, acts of genocide in which my government was either directly involved or complicitous. Auschwitz, it is my hope, will clarify something for me, even if it is only the barest glimmer of comprehension about how such murderous enforcements of policy can occur. What

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 20, 2008

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