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Nomai Dance Drama: A Surviving Spirit of Medieval Japan (review)

Nomai Dance Drama: A Surviving Spirit of Medieval Japan (review) attempt to locate Asia's vast influence in cultural organizations (the Asia Society), theatre companies (Pan Asian Theatre Company, Theatre of Yügen), theatres (La Mama ETC), universities (UCLA, Hawai`i, Pomona, Kansas, Illinois), and individuals (Robert LePage, David Hwang). Perhaps inevitably, this exercise deteriorates into a tantalizingly superficial list where a sentence sketch stands for a lifetime of achievement. Curious omissions abound. To name a few: the prolific intercultural vanguardists Peter Sellars and Julie Taymor receive only a cursory listing; IASTA's kabuki productions are noted but not its nö or Chinese opera productions; and Richard Emmert's two-decade-long English nö project is nowhere to be found. But the central problem of this survey spanning centuries, genres, and cultures is that Lee seems unable to distinguish between unidirectional influence (A saw/read B), common influence (both A and B saw/read C), and mere confluence (A is similar to B because each reflects contemporary culture). The West has so ingested Eastern aesthetics, philosophy, and theatrical practices that it is now nearly impossible to isolate the Japanese from the Western avant-garde influence. Moreover, the strict focus on American influence seems an artificial and ineffective restriction. Ultimately, perhaps, the boundary-crossing contents of this book would work http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Nomai Dance Drama: A Surviving Spirit of Medieval Japan (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 19 (1) – Mar 1, 2002

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

attempt to locate Asia's vast influence in cultural organizations (the Asia Society), theatre companies (Pan Asian Theatre Company, Theatre of Yügen), theatres (La Mama ETC), universities (UCLA, Hawai`i, Pomona, Kansas, Illinois), and individuals (Robert LePage, David Hwang). Perhaps inevitably, this exercise deteriorates into a tantalizingly superficial list where a sentence sketch stands for a lifetime of achievement. Curious omissions abound. To name a few: the prolific intercultural vanguardists Peter Sellars and Julie Taymor receive only a cursory listing; IASTA's kabuki productions are noted but not its nö or Chinese opera productions; and Richard Emmert's two-decade-long English nö project is nowhere to be found. But the central problem of this survey spanning centuries, genres, and cultures is that Lee seems unable to distinguish between unidirectional influence (A saw/read B), common influence (both A and B saw/read C), and mere confluence (A is similar to B because each reflects contemporary culture). The West has so ingested Eastern aesthetics, philosophy, and theatrical practices that it is now nearly impossible to isolate the Japanese from the Western avant-garde influence. Moreover, the strict focus on American influence seems an artificial and ineffective restriction. Ultimately, perhaps, the boundary-crossing contents of this book would work

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 1, 2002

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