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No Sword to Bury: Japanese Americans in Hawai'i during World War II (review)

No Sword to Bury: Japanese Americans in Hawai'i during World War II (review) book and media reviews be made. Sailing in the Wake of the Ancestors makes defensible compromises while telling an important story. Extending beyond the vvv experience, No Sword to Bury is a significant contribution to our understanding and analysis of Japanese American history in Hawai`i, particularly of the nisei generation, and complements well other major works that appeared in the 1990s (eg, The Japanese Conspiracy, by Masayo Duus [1999]; Americanization, Acculturation, and Ethnic Identity, by Eileen Tamura [1994]; and Cane Fires, by Gary Okihiro [1991]). Odo's achievement lies in detailing the diverse lives and viewpoints of the vvv members in their own words through many revealing oral history interviews. In providing an economic and political context for the vvv initiative, No Sword to Bury includes chapters on the Japanese American community during its two very difficult decades prior to the war, and on the socioeconomic background of the issei (immigrant) parents of vvv members, since the latter, as college students, were hardly representative of the larger community. The book also addresses much larger theoretical and substantive issues concerning Japanese Americans and race relations in the United States. As Odo argues, "The vvv was the leading wedge of a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

No Sword to Bury: Japanese Americans in Hawai'i during World War II (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 17 (1) – Jan 27, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

book and media reviews be made. Sailing in the Wake of the Ancestors makes defensible compromises while telling an important story. Extending beyond the vvv experience, No Sword to Bury is a significant contribution to our understanding and analysis of Japanese American history in Hawai`i, particularly of the nisei generation, and complements well other major works that appeared in the 1990s (eg, The Japanese Conspiracy, by Masayo Duus [1999]; Americanization, Acculturation, and Ethnic Identity, by Eileen Tamura [1994]; and Cane Fires, by Gary Okihiro [1991]). Odo's achievement lies in detailing the diverse lives and viewpoints of the vvv members in their own words through many revealing oral history interviews. In providing an economic and political context for the vvv initiative, No Sword to Bury includes chapters on the Japanese American community during its two very difficult decades prior to the war, and on the socioeconomic background of the issei (immigrant) parents of vvv members, since the latter, as college students, were hardly representative of the larger community. The book also addresses much larger theoretical and substantive issues concerning Japanese Americans and race relations in the United States. As Odo argues, "The vvv was the leading wedge of a

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 27, 2005

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