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New World Gold: Cultural Anxiety and Monetary Disorder in Early Modern Spain (review)

New World Gold: Cultural Anxiety and Monetary Disorder in Early Modern Spain (review) Book Reviews 199 that never emerged during the war. The strength of these essays is in how the authors synthesize existing material on their topics. In that sense, they are not breaking any new ground; even in their analyses one comes away more convinced that there is nothing new under the sun. The final section, “Recent Encounters (1975–Present),” consists of two brief essays that seem out of place with the book’s theme; the final essay, “Strategic Waters, Tragic Waters: Water Privatization in Vietnam,” has little to do with the West in Vietnam. The other essay, “Agent Orange, Vietnam, and the United States: Blurring the Bound- aries,” is based on interviews with one family whose child was identi- fied as “likely to have been affected by Agent Orange” (p. 177). To base an entire paper (and subsequently a published chapter) on a family who might have been affected by Agent Orange might make for a fascinat- ing narrative (it does not), but is not sufficient data to form any solid conclusions. Vietnam and the West is a difficult book to get through. The obtuse theoretical language tries to mask the fact that underneath the rheto- ric, these are not new http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

New World Gold: Cultural Anxiety and Monetary Disorder in Early Modern Spain (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 23 (1) – Jun 15, 2012

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050

Abstract

Book Reviews 199 that never emerged during the war. The strength of these essays is in how the authors synthesize existing material on their topics. In that sense, they are not breaking any new ground; even in their analyses one comes away more convinced that there is nothing new under the sun. The final section, “Recent Encounters (1975–Present),” consists of two brief essays that seem out of place with the book’s theme; the final essay, “Strategic Waters, Tragic Waters: Water Privatization in Vietnam,” has little to do with the West in Vietnam. The other essay, “Agent Orange, Vietnam, and the United States: Blurring the Bound- aries,” is based on interviews with one family whose child was identi- fied as “likely to have been affected by Agent Orange” (p. 177). To base an entire paper (and subsequently a published chapter) on a family who might have been affected by Agent Orange might make for a fascinat- ing narrative (it does not), but is not sufficient data to form any solid conclusions. Vietnam and the West is a difficult book to get through. The obtuse theoretical language tries to mask the fact that underneath the rheto- ric, these are not new

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 15, 2012

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