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New Taiwan, New China: Taiwan's Changing Role in the Asia-Pacific Region (review)

New Taiwan, New China: Taiwan's Changing Role in the Asia-Pacific Region (review) 192 China Review International: Vol. 4, No. 1, Spring 1997 temple oracles is not "the best study" (p. 15 n. 45); W. Banck's second volume, not referred to, is far more comprehensive.1 The book is very well produced. Very few misprints or typos are to be found. It is pleasing to see Chinese characters inserted in the text (a first for SUNY Press, I believe). But a few minor errors escaped the copyeditor's attention: "literati" on page 90 should be literatus (singular in Latin); "rhinoceri" on p. 96 should be rhinoceroses; and "pheonix" (pp. 225-227) should be "phoenix." Of course, my "hobby horse" is fhe spelling of "Taoism" and "Taoist." I do not object to the use of the pinyin romanization system, but "Taoism" and "Taoist" were already part of the English vocabulary before fhe birth ofpinyin. It is good to see that "Tao" appears occasionally (pp. 87 and 89). These are minor considerations. Overall, A God's Own Tale is work of excellence, and hopefully will inspire others to engage in research at the same high level of quality. Julian F. Pas University of Saskatchewan Julian F. Pas is a professor emeritus ofreligious studies specializing in Taoism in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

New Taiwan, New China: Taiwan's Changing Role in the Asia-Pacific Region (review)

China Review International , Volume 4 (1) – Mar 30, 1997

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Abstract

192 China Review International: Vol. 4, No. 1, Spring 1997 temple oracles is not "the best study" (p. 15 n. 45); W. Banck's second volume, not referred to, is far more comprehensive.1 The book is very well produced. Very few misprints or typos are to be found. It is pleasing to see Chinese characters inserted in the text (a first for SUNY Press, I believe). But a few minor errors escaped the copyeditor's attention: "literati" on page 90 should be literatus (singular in Latin); "rhinoceri" on p. 96 should be rhinoceroses; and "pheonix" (pp. 225-227) should be "phoenix." Of course, my "hobby horse" is fhe spelling of "Taoism" and "Taoist." I do not object to the use of the pinyin romanization system, but "Taoism" and "Taoist" were already part of the English vocabulary before fhe birth ofpinyin. It is good to see that "Tao" appears occasionally (pp. 87 and 89). These are minor considerations. Overall, A God's Own Tale is work of excellence, and hopefully will inspire others to engage in research at the same high level of quality. Julian F. Pas University of Saskatchewan Julian F. Pas is a professor emeritus ofreligious studies specializing in Taoism in

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 30, 1997

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