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New Caledonia

New Caledonia Melanesia in Review: Issues and Events, 2004 Reviews of Fiji, Papua New Guinea, and Solomon Islands are not included in this issue. The provincial elections in New Caledonia in May 2004 upset the political status quo in this French overseas territory, much as did the defeat of Gaston Flosse, another ally of French President Jacques Chirac, in French Polynesia that same month. In New Caledonia, Jacques Lafleur, whose loyalist Rassemblement pour la Calédonie dans la République (rpcr) had dominated the Congress (or Territorial Assembly) for a quarter century, suddenly found himself a minority leader and resigned from his seat. The new government, a coalition of former opposition parties and dissidents, continued to pass "laws of the country" and to develop its economy as the 1998 Noumea Accord empowered it to do, but labor strikes, resistance to a census that ignored ethnicity, and debates over local citizenship and identity symbols kept the "postcolonial" era lively. In April, the then-ruling rpcr celebrated its twenty-seventh anniversary in the small settler town of La Foa and launched its electoral campaign with pleas for Lafleur not to resign yet from political life, as he had repeatedly vowed to do. Kanak President of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

New Caledonia

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 17 (2)

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Melanesia in Review: Issues and Events, 2004 Reviews of Fiji, Papua New Guinea, and Solomon Islands are not included in this issue. The provincial elections in New Caledonia in May 2004 upset the political status quo in this French overseas territory, much as did the defeat of Gaston Flosse, another ally of French President Jacques Chirac, in French Polynesia that same month. In New Caledonia, Jacques Lafleur, whose loyalist Rassemblement pour la Calédonie dans la République (rpcr) had dominated the Congress (or Territorial Assembly) for a quarter century, suddenly found himself a minority leader and resigned from his seat. The new government, a coalition of former opposition parties and dissidents, continued to pass "laws of the country" and to develop its economy as the 1998 Noumea Accord empowered it to do, but labor strikes, resistance to a census that ignored ethnicity, and debates over local citizenship and identity symbols kept the "postcolonial" era lively. In April, the then-ruling rpcr celebrated its twenty-seventh anniversary in the small settler town of La Foa and launched its electoral campaign with pleas for Lafleur not to resign yet from political life, as he had repeatedly vowed to do. Kanak President of the

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

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