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"Neither East Nor West," Neither Liberal Nor Illiberal? Iranian Islamist Internationalism in the 1980s

"Neither East Nor West," Neither Liberal Nor Illiberal? Iranian Islamist Internationalism in the... “Neither East Nor West,” Neither Liberal Nor Illiberal? Iranian Islamist Internationalism in the 1980s TIMOTHY NUNAN Freie Universität Berlin, Fachbereich Geschichts- und Kulturwissenschaften ometime in the summer of 1982, the pro-Iranian Iraqi Islamist Sjournalist Ali al-Nāseri conducted a series of interviews in Tehran with other Islamists from the Middle East and Africa to discuss the future. Earlier that summer, Iranian forces had halted an Iraqi military advance and liberated the city of Khorramshahr from Saddam Hussein’s armies. Syria, an Iranian ally, had cut off Iraqi oil exports to the Mediterranean, starving the Iraqi military machine of cash. The Iraqi dictator, who oppressed Islamists like al-Nāseri within Iraq, proposed an immediate ceasefire and withdrawal from Iran. Tehran, however, rejected the offer and invaded Iraq on July 13, 1982. Assuming that the installation of a Shi’a Islamist regime in Baghdad was a foregone conclusion, al-Nāseri interviewed representatives from other Islamist groups to discuss the prospects for the “global movement of Islam,” as al-Nāseri dubbed it. Among the organizations whose representatives al-Nāseri interviewed were the Islamic Jihad organiza- tion from Tunisia, the Islamic Dawa Organization from Zaire, Amal in Lebanon, an unidentified Chadian Islamic movement, and a further unspecified “Islamic Movement” from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

"Neither East Nor West," Neither Liberal Nor Illiberal? Iranian Islamist Internationalism in the 1980s

Journal of World History , Volume 31 (1) – Feb 27, 2020

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050

Abstract

“Neither East Nor West,” Neither Liberal Nor Illiberal? Iranian Islamist Internationalism in the 1980s TIMOTHY NUNAN Freie Universität Berlin, Fachbereich Geschichts- und Kulturwissenschaften ometime in the summer of 1982, the pro-Iranian Iraqi Islamist Sjournalist Ali al-Nāseri conducted a series of interviews in Tehran with other Islamists from the Middle East and Africa to discuss the future. Earlier that summer, Iranian forces had halted an Iraqi military advance and liberated the city of Khorramshahr from Saddam Hussein’s armies. Syria, an Iranian ally, had cut off Iraqi oil exports to the Mediterranean, starving the Iraqi military machine of cash. The Iraqi dictator, who oppressed Islamists like al-Nāseri within Iraq, proposed an immediate ceasefire and withdrawal from Iran. Tehran, however, rejected the offer and invaded Iraq on July 13, 1982. Assuming that the installation of a Shi’a Islamist regime in Baghdad was a foregone conclusion, al-Nāseri interviewed representatives from other Islamist groups to discuss the prospects for the “global movement of Islam,” as al-Nāseri dubbed it. Among the organizations whose representatives al-Nāseri interviewed were the Islamic Jihad organiza- tion from Tunisia, the Islamic Dawa Organization from Zaire, Amal in Lebanon, an unidentified Chadian Islamic movement, and a further unspecified “Islamic Movement” from

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 27, 2020

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