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Negation in Saisiyat: Another Perspective

Negation in Saisiyat: Another Perspective Squib Elizabeth Zeitoun academia sinica In a recent paper, Mei-li Yeh compares the distribution and function of eight Saisiyat negators and attempts to resolve the following questions: (1) What is the morphosyntactic relationship that 'oka', 'okay, 'okik, 'amkay, and 'amkik bear to one another? (2) Why are certain negators followed by a "ligature" (either 'i or 'ik) and others not? (3) Is it the negator or the ligature that determines the marking of the negated verb as dependent or independent? While the ²rst of these questions is well handled, Yeh is unable to answer the last two questions. Based on my own ²eldnotes, I suggest answers, showing that together with 'oka', 'izi', and 'i'ini', both dynamic and stative verbs occur in their [+dependent] form, and demonstrating that while 'i is a ligature, 'ik is not. I also account for the distributional differences between 'oka', '¿izi', and 'i'ini', on the one hand, and kayni' on the other. 1. INTRODUCTION. In a recent paper, Yeh (2000b)1 compares the distribution and function of eight Saisiyat negators ('oka', 'okay, 'okik, 'amkay, 'amkik, 'izi', 'in'ini,2 and kayni') and attempts to resolve the following questions: what is the morphosyntactic relationship that 'oka', 'okay, 'okik, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

Negation in Saisiyat: Another Perspective

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 40 (1) – Jan 6, 2001

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
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1527-9421
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Abstract

Squib Elizabeth Zeitoun academia sinica In a recent paper, Mei-li Yeh compares the distribution and function of eight Saisiyat negators and attempts to resolve the following questions: (1) What is the morphosyntactic relationship that 'oka', 'okay, 'okik, 'amkay, and 'amkik bear to one another? (2) Why are certain negators followed by a "ligature" (either 'i or 'ik) and others not? (3) Is it the negator or the ligature that determines the marking of the negated verb as dependent or independent? While the ²rst of these questions is well handled, Yeh is unable to answer the last two questions. Based on my own ²eldnotes, I suggest answers, showing that together with 'oka', 'izi', and 'i'ini', both dynamic and stative verbs occur in their [+dependent] form, and demonstrating that while 'i is a ligature, 'ik is not. I also account for the distributional differences between 'oka', '¿izi', and 'i'ini', on the one hand, and kayni' on the other. 1. INTRODUCTION. In a recent paper, Yeh (2000b)1 compares the distribution and function of eight Saisiyat negators ('oka', 'okay, 'okik, 'amkay, 'amkik, 'izi', 'in'ini,2 and kayni') and attempts to resolve the following questions: what is the morphosyntactic relationship that 'oka', 'okay, 'okik,

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 6, 2001

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