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Navies in History (review)

Navies in History (review) Book Reviews 353 Navies in History. By clark g. reynolds. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1998. Pp. xi + 267. $35.00 (cloth); $24.95 (paper). Few, if any scholars, are as well prepared as Clark Reynolds to undertake the daunting task in surveying and assessing the impact of navies on world affairs from ancient times to the present. In seventeen 354 journal of world history, fall 2000 chapters, including two chapters on the period before 1500, three on the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and three each on the eigh- teenth and nineteenth centuries, to five on the twentieth century, Reynolds explains how continental and maritime powers have utilized their navies in the inevitable struggle to gain power. His focus is world- wide, including brief coverage even of South and East Asian naval forces from the sixth through the sixteenth centuries. In clear, crisp prose Reynolds demonstrates that great maritime powers have traditionally acted offensively and employed strong battle fleets to defend against invasion, protect their merchant shipping and attack that of the enemy, blockade enemy coasts, engage in combined operations, and, during the twentieth century, to conduct strategic bombardment. Great continental powers have usually adopted a defen- sive naval posture, maintained http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Navies in History (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 11 (2) – Oct 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050

Abstract

Book Reviews 353 Navies in History. By clark g. reynolds. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1998. Pp. xi + 267. $35.00 (cloth); $24.95 (paper). Few, if any scholars, are as well prepared as Clark Reynolds to undertake the daunting task in surveying and assessing the impact of navies on world affairs from ancient times to the present. In seventeen 354 journal of world history, fall 2000 chapters, including two chapters on the period before 1500, three on the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and three each on the eigh- teenth and nineteenth centuries, to five on the twentieth century, Reynolds explains how continental and maritime powers have utilized their navies in the inevitable struggle to gain power. His focus is world- wide, including brief coverage even of South and East Asian naval forces from the sixth through the sixteenth centuries. In clear, crisp prose Reynolds demonstrates that great maritime powers have traditionally acted offensively and employed strong battle fleets to defend against invasion, protect their merchant shipping and attack that of the enemy, blockade enemy coasts, engage in combined operations, and, during the twentieth century, to conduct strategic bombardment. Great continental powers have usually adopted a defen- sive naval posture, maintained

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2001

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