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Native Peoples and Colonialism (review)

Native Peoples and Colonialism (review) Native Peoples and Colonialism. A special double issue of BC Studies: The British Columbia Quarterly. Edited by cole harris and jean barman. Vols. 115­16 (autumn /winter 1997­98). Pp. 307. $20 (this issue). Land claims by native peoples of British Columbia, one of which culminated in a momentous 1997 ruling from Canada's Supreme Court (Delgamuukw v. British Columbia), have attracted international attention recently. In other British Commonwealth countries and in the United States particularly, people interested in the rights and experiences of indigenous groups are comparing British Columbia's journal of world history, spring 2000 history to theirs. For instance, a lawyer for the claimants in Delgamuukw told me that Australian advocates of aboriginal rights had invited him over to discuss the implications of the case for their cause. Conversely, native land claims have prompted many British Columbians to think about their province in an international context. Students of regional history and ethnic relations have become more conscious of British Columbia's place in the worldwide history of European colonialism. This special issue of BC Studies testifies to that heightened consciousness. Indeed, the editors decided to publish a special issue entitled Native Peoples and Colonialism when they "suddenly" received several manuscripts http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Native Peoples and Colonialism (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 11 (1) – Mar 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

Native Peoples and Colonialism. A special double issue of BC Studies: The British Columbia Quarterly. Edited by cole harris and jean barman. Vols. 115­16 (autumn /winter 1997­98). Pp. 307. $20 (this issue). Land claims by native peoples of British Columbia, one of which culminated in a momentous 1997 ruling from Canada's Supreme Court (Delgamuukw v. British Columbia), have attracted international attention recently. In other British Commonwealth countries and in the United States particularly, people interested in the rights and experiences of indigenous groups are comparing British Columbia's journal of world history, spring 2000 history to theirs. For instance, a lawyer for the claimants in Delgamuukw told me that Australian advocates of aboriginal rights had invited him over to discuss the implications of the case for their cause. Conversely, native land claims have prompted many British Columbians to think about their province in an international context. Students of regional history and ethnic relations have become more conscious of British Columbia's place in the worldwide history of European colonialism. This special issue of BC Studies testifies to that heightened consciousness. Indeed, the editors decided to publish a special issue entitled Native Peoples and Colonialism when they "suddenly" received several manuscripts

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 1, 2000

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