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National Treasure, and: Spirit Bird Journey (review)

National Treasure, and: Spirit Bird Journey (review) asian perspectives 40 (2) fall 2001 largest ships stay in port. Similarly, although some younger sailors can only sail by a magnetic compass, most older sailors can still use the stars, wind, and other cues from their environment to set courses and steer. And, like sailors elsewhere, at night the Bugis still mostly steer by the stars, rather than slavishly trying to follow the gyrations of a compass needle. At the heart of this book are two chapters on navigation. The first is devoted to o¤shore navigation in which conceptual compasses, one denoted by wind directions and the other by the rising and setting points of stars, are employed along with the magnetic compass. The second chapter focuses on piloting, that is guiding a ship through reference landmarks, depth soundings, tidal patterns, coastal currents, and other land-related phenomena. The wealth of material presented in these two chapters is much too rich to summarize here. Let me just say that it is one of the best integrated presentations of indigenous navigation I have read, and one that suggests a continuity of Austronesian practices extending at least from Indonesian waters through to the far reaches of Remote Oceania. In particular http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Perspectives University of Hawai'I Press

National Treasure, and: Spirit Bird Journey (review)

Asian Perspectives , Volume 40 (2) – Jan 11, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1535-8283
Publisher site
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Abstract

asian perspectives 40 (2) fall 2001 largest ships stay in port. Similarly, although some younger sailors can only sail by a magnetic compass, most older sailors can still use the stars, wind, and other cues from their environment to set courses and steer. And, like sailors elsewhere, at night the Bugis still mostly steer by the stars, rather than slavishly trying to follow the gyrations of a compass needle. At the heart of this book are two chapters on navigation. The first is devoted to o¤shore navigation in which conceptual compasses, one denoted by wind directions and the other by the rising and setting points of stars, are employed along with the magnetic compass. The second chapter focuses on piloting, that is guiding a ship through reference landmarks, depth soundings, tidal patterns, coastal currents, and other land-related phenomena. The wealth of material presented in these two chapters is much too rich to summarize here. Let me just say that it is one of the best integrated presentations of indigenous navigation I have read, and one that suggests a continuity of Austronesian practices extending at least from Indonesian waters through to the far reaches of Remote Oceania. In particular

Journal

Asian PerspectivesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 11, 2001

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