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Mystical Consciousness: Western Perspectives and Dialogue with Japanese Thinkers (review)

Mystical Consciousness: Western Perspectives and Dialogue with Japanese Thinkers (review) seems problematic to interpret ying as spontaneous responses in all places where Xunzi uses it. Linguistically, ying does not have to refer to spontaneous response. Ying as response may be a result of careful deliberation. When one says in Chinese ``responding to all changes by no change'' (yi bubian ying wanbian åØÇØ), ying is about the way to deal with things and about responding to things with the attitude that is not affected by external stimulations. When Xunzi talks about Ø w (responding to change without limit) or åsØ (responding through righteousness), ying seems to be this kind, but not spontaneous responsiveness. In spite of these imperfections, On the Epistemology of the Senses in Early Chinese Thought is still a book I strongly recommend to anyone interested in Chinese philosophy. Whether one agrees or disagrees with Geaney's conclusions on early Chinese views of the senses, her book is an excellent reference for further studies of the epistemology of the senses in early Chinese thought. We should all be thankful to her for such a pioneering work. Mystical Consciousness: Western Perspectives and Dialogue with Japanese Thinkers. By Louis Roy, O.P. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2003. Pp. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Mystical Consciousness: Western Perspectives and Dialogue with Japanese Thinkers (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 55 (3) – Jul 7, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898
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Abstract

seems problematic to interpret ying as spontaneous responses in all places where Xunzi uses it. Linguistically, ying does not have to refer to spontaneous response. Ying as response may be a result of careful deliberation. When one says in Chinese ``responding to all changes by no change'' (yi bubian ying wanbian åØÇØ), ying is about the way to deal with things and about responding to things with the attitude that is not affected by external stimulations. When Xunzi talks about Ø w (responding to change without limit) or åsØ (responding through righteousness), ying seems to be this kind, but not spontaneous responsiveness. In spite of these imperfections, On the Epistemology of the Senses in Early Chinese Thought is still a book I strongly recommend to anyone interested in Chinese philosophy. Whether one agrees or disagrees with Geaney's conclusions on early Chinese views of the senses, her book is an excellent reference for further studies of the epistemology of the senses in early Chinese thought. We should all be thankful to her for such a pioneering work. Mystical Consciousness: Western Perspectives and Dialogue with Japanese Thinkers. By Louis Roy, O.P. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2003. Pp.

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 7, 2005

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