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Music at the Borders: Not Drowning, Waving and Their Engagement with Papua New Guinean Culture (1986-96), and: Sound Alliances: Indigenous Peoples, Cultural Politics, and Popular Music in the Pacific (review)

Music at the Borders: Not Drowning, Waving and Their Engagement with Papua New Guinean Culture... the contemporary pacific · fall 2000 Music at the Borders: Not Drowning, Waving and Their Engagement with Papua New Guinean Culture (1986­96), by Philip Hayward. Sydney: John Libbey, 1998. isbn 1-86462-012-9; vii + 216 pages, photographs, glossary, notes, bibliography, index. Paper, a$29.95. Sound Alliances: Indigenous Peoples, Cultural Politics and Popular Music in the Pacific, edited by Philip Hayward. London and New York: Cassell, 1998. isbn 0-304-70055-x, cloth; 0-304-70050-9, paper; x + 220 pages, tables, figures, notes, bibliography, discographies, index. Cloth, us$79.50; paper, us$21.95. Throughout the 1990s, Philip Hayward has been the driving force behind popular music studies in Australia, founding Perfect Beat: The Pacific Journal of Research into Contemporary Music and Popular Culture in 1992, continuing to edit that journal until 1998, the year in which the Centre for Contemporary Music Studies (at Macquarie University, Sydney) was established under his directorship. These two publications--the first the result of Hayward's own PhD research, and the second an anthology of significant publications from the first five years of Perfect Beat--are, together, a significant milestone and achievement. Hayward's scholarship elegantly com- book reviews bines the (often divergent, if not mutually exclusive) ethnographic and musicological streams of contemporary music studies to create http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Music at the Borders: Not Drowning, Waving and Their Engagement with Papua New Guinean Culture (1986-96), and: Sound Alliances: Indigenous Peoples, Cultural Politics, and Popular Music in the Pacific (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 12 (2) – Jul 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · fall 2000 Music at the Borders: Not Drowning, Waving and Their Engagement with Papua New Guinean Culture (1986­96), by Philip Hayward. Sydney: John Libbey, 1998. isbn 1-86462-012-9; vii + 216 pages, photographs, glossary, notes, bibliography, index. Paper, a$29.95. Sound Alliances: Indigenous Peoples, Cultural Politics and Popular Music in the Pacific, edited by Philip Hayward. London and New York: Cassell, 1998. isbn 0-304-70055-x, cloth; 0-304-70050-9, paper; x + 220 pages, tables, figures, notes, bibliography, discographies, index. Cloth, us$79.50; paper, us$21.95. Throughout the 1990s, Philip Hayward has been the driving force behind popular music studies in Australia, founding Perfect Beat: The Pacific Journal of Research into Contemporary Music and Popular Culture in 1992, continuing to edit that journal until 1998, the year in which the Centre for Contemporary Music Studies (at Macquarie University, Sydney) was established under his directorship. These two publications--the first the result of Hayward's own PhD research, and the second an anthology of significant publications from the first five years of Perfect Beat--are, together, a significant milestone and achievement. Hayward's scholarship elegantly com- book reviews bines the (often divergent, if not mutually exclusive) ethnographic and musicological streams of contemporary music studies to create

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 1, 2000

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