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Mr. Tulsi's Store: A Fijian Journey (review)

Mr. Tulsi's Store: A Fijian Journey (review) book and media reviews sense of himself as both a casualty of colonialism and a displaced person living in the West. Barbara Creed identifies the film Jedda (1955) as a reverse captivity narrative. Here, a pastoralist family "rescues" Jedda from her own people to transform her into a "white" girl. A second capture concerns Jedda's abduction by a "wild" tribal Aborigine to whom she is attracted, although she was meant to marry the half-caste Joe. This tale of sexuality and eroticism documents the range of cultural spaces occupied by indigenous people when assimilation was the official policy of the Commonwealth government. Finally, Freda Freiberg recounts the sorry tale of the comfort women of World War II, incarcerated in houses of prostitution from which they were unable to escape except by suicide. Commissioned to do research on documentaries about the comfort women, Freiberg provides a nuanced account of the terrible evidence of the abduction, rape, and forced labor of women by Japanese military forces. She also shows that the filmmakers provided a forum for the women to express grievances, revealing areas of experience largely ignored by historians. The August 2002 repatriation to South Africa of the remains of Saartjie http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Mr. Tulsi's Store: A Fijian Journey (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 15 (2) – Aug 7, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

book and media reviews sense of himself as both a casualty of colonialism and a displaced person living in the West. Barbara Creed identifies the film Jedda (1955) as a reverse captivity narrative. Here, a pastoralist family "rescues" Jedda from her own people to transform her into a "white" girl. A second capture concerns Jedda's abduction by a "wild" tribal Aborigine to whom she is attracted, although she was meant to marry the half-caste Joe. This tale of sexuality and eroticism documents the range of cultural spaces occupied by indigenous people when assimilation was the official policy of the Commonwealth government. Finally, Freda Freiberg recounts the sorry tale of the comfort women of World War II, incarcerated in houses of prostitution from which they were unable to escape except by suicide. Commissioned to do research on documentaries about the comfort women, Freiberg provides a nuanced account of the terrible evidence of the abduction, rape, and forced labor of women by Japanese military forces. She also shows that the filmmakers provided a forum for the women to express grievances, revealing areas of experience largely ignored by historians. The August 2002 repatriation to South Africa of the remains of Saartjie

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 7, 2003

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