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Moving Images: John Layard, Fieldwork and Photography on Malakula since 1914 (review)

Moving Images: John Layard, Fieldwork and Photography on Malakula since 1914 (review) the contemporary pacific · 23:1 (2011) Moving Images: John Layard, Fieldwork and Photography on Malakula since 1914, by Haidy Geismar and Anita Herle. Adelaide: Crawford House Publishing, in association with University of Cambridge Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, 2009. isbn 978-1-86333-319-1, xii + 308 pages, 240 dual-tone photographs, maps, index. Cloth, a$89.95. This fine book is an important contribution to both the history of anthropology and the history of Vanuatu. John Layard's fieldwork, primarily on Atchin and Vao in Northeast Malakula in 1914 and 1915, was contemporaneous with Bronislaw Malinowski's first trip to New Guinea, but Layard has not been accorded the same status as a "founding father" of British social anthropology in the conventional genealogies of the discipline. Paradoxically perhaps, Layard has been more positively remembered in those "small islands" where he lived for barely nine months than in academic annals. This book both reveals and transforms his Janus face in these twin genealogies. The authors articulate these histories through the medium of Layard's photographs. Using a cumbersome early camera he produced about 450 images. He deposited the glass plate negatives with and donated selected copy prints to the Cambridge Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. The fragile http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Moving Images: John Layard, Fieldwork and Photography on Malakula since 1914 (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 23 (1) – Mar 26, 2011

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 23:1 (2011) Moving Images: John Layard, Fieldwork and Photography on Malakula since 1914, by Haidy Geismar and Anita Herle. Adelaide: Crawford House Publishing, in association with University of Cambridge Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, 2009. isbn 978-1-86333-319-1, xii + 308 pages, 240 dual-tone photographs, maps, index. Cloth, a$89.95. This fine book is an important contribution to both the history of anthropology and the history of Vanuatu. John Layard's fieldwork, primarily on Atchin and Vao in Northeast Malakula in 1914 and 1915, was contemporaneous with Bronislaw Malinowski's first trip to New Guinea, but Layard has not been accorded the same status as a "founding father" of British social anthropology in the conventional genealogies of the discipline. Paradoxically perhaps, Layard has been more positively remembered in those "small islands" where he lived for barely nine months than in academic annals. This book both reveals and transforms his Janus face in these twin genealogies. The authors articulate these histories through the medium of Layard's photographs. Using a cumbersome early camera he produced about 450 images. He deposited the glass plate negatives with and donated selected copy prints to the Cambridge Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. The fragile

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 26, 2011

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