Morality and Monastic Revival in Post-Mao Tibet by Jane E. Caple (review)

Morality and Monastic Revival in Post-Mao Tibet by Jane E. Caple (review) Reviews 21 produce rice for the world’s largest consuming nation and, perhaps more significant, that of food sovereignty—to secure the intellectual property rights (IPR) such that private or foreign corporations would not deter access to this primary food staple similar to the story of Bt cotton. In tracing the distribution of patents, Cao engages STS methods to examine the commercialization process for GM rice in China. The gene technology and regulatory elements of two domestic strains of Bt rice illustrated in Figure 7.4 reflects the complex “long-chain” (p. 173) research and development pipeline which extends into the competitive patent landscape. Cao’s analysis of the “right to know” movement concerning GM food labelling reflect how Chinese publics became animated regarding transgenic technology in food. The engagement of non-governmental organizations (NGO) such as Greenpeace, anti-GMO activists, and science journal coverage all contributed towards raising public awareness. The shift of social debates from earlier concerns of food security or biosafety by reframing GMOs as issues of food safety has greatly transformed science policymaking process in China. In examining “China as a GMO Nation” in the final chapter, Cao makes the pragmatic assessment that planting GM crops or placing gene-edited rice on tables http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Morality and Monastic Revival in Post-Mao Tibet by Jane E. Caple (review)

China Review International, Volume 25 (1) – Mar 6, 2020

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

Reviews 21 produce rice for the world’s largest consuming nation and, perhaps more significant, that of food sovereignty—to secure the intellectual property rights (IPR) such that private or foreign corporations would not deter access to this primary food staple similar to the story of Bt cotton. In tracing the distribution of patents, Cao engages STS methods to examine the commercialization process for GM rice in China. The gene technology and regulatory elements of two domestic strains of Bt rice illustrated in Figure 7.4 reflects the complex “long-chain” (p. 173) research and development pipeline which extends into the competitive patent landscape. Cao’s analysis of the “right to know” movement concerning GM food labelling reflect how Chinese publics became animated regarding transgenic technology in food. The engagement of non-governmental organizations (NGO) such as Greenpeace, anti-GMO activists, and science journal coverage all contributed towards raising public awareness. The shift of social debates from earlier concerns of food security or biosafety by reframing GMOs as issues of food safety has greatly transformed science policymaking process in China. In examining “China as a GMO Nation” in the final chapter, Cao makes the pragmatic assessment that planting GM crops or placing gene-edited rice on tables

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 6, 2020

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