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Modern Intellectual Readings of the Kharijites (review)

Modern Intellectual Readings of the Kharijites (review) usage is clearly inherited from Mms epistemology, which restricts the domain of the Veda to the sphere of otherwise unfathomable truths, such as dharma. The philologically relevant part of the book consists of a critical edition, introduced by an informative chapter on the history of the textual transmission. There are major flaws in Gupta's methodology and application of textual criticism, although their discussion goes beyond the scope of this review. Enough to say that Gupta's explanations about the purpose, role, and impact of his new edition on the translation and the study of Jva's work are hardly convincing. In what respect does Gupta's effort improve on the 1951 edition by Purdsa Mahaya, which is based on better sources than Gupta's? Gupta's text diverges from Purdsa's only rarely, and when it does the differences are rather trivial. The new edition provided by Gupta seems little more than a collation of variants from sources of unproved value, with both the text and apparatus still requiring critical editing. Gupta seems aware of the provisional nature of his effort, when he concedes that "the manuscript examination process is not yet complete . . . [and] a reduction of the apparatus would be http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Modern Intellectual Readings of the Kharijites (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 60 (2) – Apr 24, 2010

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1529-1898
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Abstract

usage is clearly inherited from Mms epistemology, which restricts the domain of the Veda to the sphere of otherwise unfathomable truths, such as dharma. The philologically relevant part of the book consists of a critical edition, introduced by an informative chapter on the history of the textual transmission. There are major flaws in Gupta's methodology and application of textual criticism, although their discussion goes beyond the scope of this review. Enough to say that Gupta's explanations about the purpose, role, and impact of his new edition on the translation and the study of Jva's work are hardly convincing. In what respect does Gupta's effort improve on the 1951 edition by Purdsa Mahaya, which is based on better sources than Gupta's? Gupta's text diverges from Purdsa's only rarely, and when it does the differences are rather trivial. The new edition provided by Gupta seems little more than a collation of variants from sources of unproved value, with both the text and apparatus still requiring critical editing. Gupta seems aware of the provisional nature of his effort, when he concedes that "the manuscript examination process is not yet complete . . . [and] a reduction of the apparatus would be

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 24, 2010

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