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Mishima on Stage: The Black Lizard and Other Plays (review)

Mishima on Stage: The Black Lizard and Other Plays (review) In the poignant "Traces of a Dream on a Single Sheet," Zeami mourns the early death of his eldest son and heir, Motomasa, to whom he had entrusted his own teachings and the teachings of his father. In despair, contemplating the future of his art, Zeami writes, "I see that I am to accomplish nothing more than to turn it all into dust and smoke, unmastered and profitless" (425). Despite his brilliance, Zeami could not envision a future where nö practitioners could read and ponder his concepts or could even have a sense of the person he was. The work Hare began in Zeami's Style (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1986) has reached a zenith in Zeami: Performance Notes. Joni Koehn Rio Salado College MISHIMA ON STAGE: THE BLACK LIZARD AND OTHER PLAYS. Edited and with an introduction by Laurence Kominz; foreword by Donald Keene. Michigan Monograph Series in Japanese Studies 59. Ann Arbor: Center for Japanese Studies, University of Michigan, 2007. xii + 328 pp. 27 black-andwhite photos. Cloth, $70.00; paper, $26.00. Mishima Yukio is an endlessly fascinating--and endlessly maddening--writer and personality. Due primarily to his spectacular 1970 suicide protesting the weakened role of the emperor and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Mishima on Stage: The Black Lizard and Other Plays (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 26 (1) – Apr 1, 2008

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-2109
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Abstract

In the poignant "Traces of a Dream on a Single Sheet," Zeami mourns the early death of his eldest son and heir, Motomasa, to whom he had entrusted his own teachings and the teachings of his father. In despair, contemplating the future of his art, Zeami writes, "I see that I am to accomplish nothing more than to turn it all into dust and smoke, unmastered and profitless" (425). Despite his brilliance, Zeami could not envision a future where nö practitioners could read and ponder his concepts or could even have a sense of the person he was. The work Hare began in Zeami's Style (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1986) has reached a zenith in Zeami: Performance Notes. Joni Koehn Rio Salado College MISHIMA ON STAGE: THE BLACK LIZARD AND OTHER PLAYS. Edited and with an introduction by Laurence Kominz; foreword by Donald Keene. Michigan Monograph Series in Japanese Studies 59. Ann Arbor: Center for Japanese Studies, University of Michigan, 2007. xii + 328 pp. 27 black-andwhite photos. Cloth, $70.00; paper, $26.00. Mishima Yukio is an endlessly fascinating--and endlessly maddening--writer and personality. Due primarily to his spectacular 1970 suicide protesting the weakened role of the emperor and

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 1, 2008

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