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Mining and Indigenous Lifeworlds in Australia and Papua New Guinea (review)

Mining and Indigenous Lifeworlds in Australia and Papua New Guinea (review) book and media reviews Foreign Policy Directions," includes three papers on New Zealand's regional orientation (Macdonald); multilateralism ( Jackson); and New Zealand's relations with the United States (McCormick). Macdonald's survey will assist the uninformed, but needs corrections (the Southeast-Asia Treaty Organization was formed in 1954; the South Pacific Nuclear Weapons Free Zone has been ratified by the nuclear-weapons states concerned; the first of Fiji's coups occurred in 1987, not 1986). Jackson offers the most systematic attempt in this section to address the New Zealand /globalization linkage. He looks to the United Nations setting to provide evidence of this country's small-state, good-citizen, and order-creation strivings. During the murderous madness that enveloped Rwanda in 1994, and as a serving non-permanent UN Security Council member, New Zealand projected a solitary voice of principle. McCormick traces the last two decades of New Zealand's relations with the United States through phases deciphered as estrangement, tentative engagement, and increasingly closer ties. Unlike Australia, New Zealand has been content to operate below Washington's radar. Here, McCormick has failed to check his sources accurately, uncritically citing an erroneous claim from a 2002 Congressional Research Survey asserting that, like Australia, New Zealand invoked Article 4 of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Mining and Indigenous Lifeworlds in Australia and Papua New Guinea (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 18 (2) – Jul 27, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

book and media reviews Foreign Policy Directions," includes three papers on New Zealand's regional orientation (Macdonald); multilateralism ( Jackson); and New Zealand's relations with the United States (McCormick). Macdonald's survey will assist the uninformed, but needs corrections (the Southeast-Asia Treaty Organization was formed in 1954; the South Pacific Nuclear Weapons Free Zone has been ratified by the nuclear-weapons states concerned; the first of Fiji's coups occurred in 1987, not 1986). Jackson offers the most systematic attempt in this section to address the New Zealand /globalization linkage. He looks to the United Nations setting to provide evidence of this country's small-state, good-citizen, and order-creation strivings. During the murderous madness that enveloped Rwanda in 1994, and as a serving non-permanent UN Security Council member, New Zealand projected a solitary voice of principle. McCormick traces the last two decades of New Zealand's relations with the United States through phases deciphered as estrangement, tentative engagement, and increasingly closer ties. Unlike Australia, New Zealand has been content to operate below Washington's radar. Here, McCormick has failed to check his sources accurately, uncritically citing an erroneous claim from a 2002 Congressional Research Survey asserting that, like Australia, New Zealand invoked Article 4 of the

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 27, 2006

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