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Ming Taizu (r. 1368–98) and the Foundation of the Ming Dynasty in China by Hok-lam Chan (review)

Ming Taizu (r. 1368–98) and the Foundation of the Ming Dynasty in China by Hok-lam Chan (review) Reviews Back in France, Barthes wrote one article on China, but never the book he was planning on the last page of Notebook 3. As for Tel Quel, it devoted its autumn 1974 issue to the trip, but afterward moved away from its Maoist stance. By the end of the 1970s, it was exploring theological questions, perhaps not a surprising development considering that Barthes and Sollers were both Jesuit-educated, while Kristeva had been schooled by Dominican nuns. It ceased publication altogether in 1982, by which time China had also left Mao far behind, and it is ironic to reflect that the first Frenchmen to encounter China were Jesuits sent by Louis XIV, three centuries before. What Barthes would ultimately have made of his trip is unknown, since he was killed by a Parisian laundry van in 1980, but he had by then decided that Marxism was just as guilty of creating mythological stereotypes as bourgeois culture. Hence, the trip appears to have been a critical experience in the lives of its participants, since they changed after it. Barthes's notebooks are, in the final analysis, a record of a highly unusual East-West encounter that took place in a bygone http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Ming Taizu (r. 1368–98) and the Foundation of the Ming Dynasty in China by Hok-lam Chan (review)

China Review International , Volume 19 (3) – Apr 15, 2012

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
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Abstract

Reviews Back in France, Barthes wrote one article on China, but never the book he was planning on the last page of Notebook 3. As for Tel Quel, it devoted its autumn 1974 issue to the trip, but afterward moved away from its Maoist stance. By the end of the 1970s, it was exploring theological questions, perhaps not a surprising development considering that Barthes and Sollers were both Jesuit-educated, while Kristeva had been schooled by Dominican nuns. It ceased publication altogether in 1982, by which time China had also left Mao far behind, and it is ironic to reflect that the first Frenchmen to encounter China were Jesuits sent by Louis XIV, three centuries before. What Barthes would ultimately have made of his trip is unknown, since he was killed by a Parisian laundry van in 1980, but he had by then decided that Marxism was just as guilty of creating mythological stereotypes as bourgeois culture. Hence, the trip appears to have been a critical experience in the lives of its participants, since they changed after it. Barthes's notebooks are, in the final analysis, a record of a highly unusual East-West encounter that took place in a bygone

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 15, 2012

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