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Mindful Politics: A Buddhist Guide to Making the World a Better Place (review)

Mindful Politics: A Buddhist Guide to Making the World a Better Place (review) BUDDHIST-CHRISTIAN STUDIES MINDFUL POLITICS: A BUDDHIST GUIDE TO MAKING THE WORLD A BETTER PLACE. Edited by Melvin Mcleod. Boston: Wisdom publications, 2006. 307 pp. The 2008 political season in the United States can be interpreted as provisional confirmation of the assertion made by Jim Wallis, in his recent work The Great Awakening (2008), that the culture has moved beyond a period in which the religious right dominated the voice of religion in the public sphere. Wallis, writing as a "progressive evangelical," argues that the monologue of the religious right in the domain of values and the collective consequences of faith positions has ended, and that a plurality of religious and ethical voices have emerged in the collective conversation about how we should live. Wallis contests the hegemony of the right from within the discourse of evangelical Protestantism, but he sees himself as in alliance with other thinkers and activists who, if not constituting a "religious left," speak for the emancipatory possibilities of religious and spiritual perspectives. Rabbi Michael Lerner's "network of spiritual progressives" joins Wallis's "Call to Renewal," progressive movements within the Roman Catholic Church, progressive Muslims, and "socially engaged Buddhists" in charting a new set of possibilities http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Mindful Politics: A Buddhist Guide to Making the World a Better Place (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 29 (1) – Oct 17, 2009

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9472
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Abstract

BUDDHIST-CHRISTIAN STUDIES MINDFUL POLITICS: A BUDDHIST GUIDE TO MAKING THE WORLD A BETTER PLACE. Edited by Melvin Mcleod. Boston: Wisdom publications, 2006. 307 pp. The 2008 political season in the United States can be interpreted as provisional confirmation of the assertion made by Jim Wallis, in his recent work The Great Awakening (2008), that the culture has moved beyond a period in which the religious right dominated the voice of religion in the public sphere. Wallis, writing as a "progressive evangelical," argues that the monologue of the religious right in the domain of values and the collective consequences of faith positions has ended, and that a plurality of religious and ethical voices have emerged in the collective conversation about how we should live. Wallis contests the hegemony of the right from within the discourse of evangelical Protestantism, but he sees himself as in alliance with other thinkers and activists who, if not constituting a "religious left," speak for the emancipatory possibilities of religious and spiritual perspectives. Rabbi Michael Lerner's "network of spiritual progressives" joins Wallis's "Call to Renewal," progressive movements within the Roman Catholic Church, progressive Muslims, and "socially engaged Buddhists" in charting a new set of possibilities

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 17, 2009

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