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Migration and Ethnicity in Chinese History: Hakkas, Pengmin, and Their Neighbors (review)

Migration and Ethnicity in Chinese History: Hakkas, Pengmin, and Their Neighbors (review) Migration and Ethnicity in Chinese History: Hakkas, Pengmin, and Their Neighbors. By leong sow-theng. Edited by tim wright. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1997. Pp. xix + 234. $45 (cloth). Ethnic identity is forged not just by psychology, but by material forces. China's powerfully unified ethnic identity is famous: Han Chinese descendants of the people of the Yellow River Plain, unified by the Emperor Qin Shi over two thousand years ago. Leong Sow-Theng's beautifully detailed posthumous volume Migration and Ethnicity in Chinese History examines how migration shaped the identity of the Hakka people. His perspective reveals strongly contested and divergent local ethnic identities, languages, and cultures, each modeled in contact and conflict with other local peoples. The Hakkas belong to China's ethnic Han Chinese majority, 94% of the population. (The fifty-six officially recognized national minorities, including ethnic Koreans, Tibetans, Mongols, and Miao, are 6%.) The Hakkas, just 3% of China's population, are the smallest of the seven major Han Chinese subgroups, each with its own local culture and dialect, as different as Eng- Book Reviews lish from German. Most northerners belong to the native Mandarinspeaking 70%. The other groups are the Cantonese, the Wu speakers (from around Shanghai), http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Migration and Ethnicity in Chinese History: Hakkas, Pengmin, and Their Neighbors (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 11 (1) – Mar 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
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Abstract

Migration and Ethnicity in Chinese History: Hakkas, Pengmin, and Their Neighbors. By leong sow-theng. Edited by tim wright. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1997. Pp. xix + 234. $45 (cloth). Ethnic identity is forged not just by psychology, but by material forces. China's powerfully unified ethnic identity is famous: Han Chinese descendants of the people of the Yellow River Plain, unified by the Emperor Qin Shi over two thousand years ago. Leong Sow-Theng's beautifully detailed posthumous volume Migration and Ethnicity in Chinese History examines how migration shaped the identity of the Hakka people. His perspective reveals strongly contested and divergent local ethnic identities, languages, and cultures, each modeled in contact and conflict with other local peoples. The Hakkas belong to China's ethnic Han Chinese majority, 94% of the population. (The fifty-six officially recognized national minorities, including ethnic Koreans, Tibetans, Mongols, and Miao, are 6%.) The Hakkas, just 3% of China's population, are the smallest of the seven major Han Chinese subgroups, each with its own local culture and dialect, as different as Eng- Book Reviews lish from German. Most northerners belong to the native Mandarinspeaking 70%. The other groups are the Cantonese, the Wu speakers (from around Shanghai),

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 1, 2000

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