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Memory Effects: The Holocaust and the Art of Secondary Witnessing (review)

Memory Effects: The Holocaust and the Art of Secondary Witnessing (review) 07-reviews (Bio 26-3) 9/4/03 8:23 AM Page 487 Reviews 487 Dora Apel. Memory Effects: The Holocaust and the Art of Secondary Witness- ing. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers UP, 2002. 241 pp. 6 color, 63 b/w illus. ISBN 0-8135-3048-2, $65.00 cloth; ISBN 0-8135-3049-0, $28.00 paper. Dora Apel’s interesting new book, Memory Effects, takes its place in a series of recent publications on the study of memory, the establishment of memo- rials, and the problem of the representation of the events of the Holocaust. These include Dominick LaCapra’s Representing the Holocaust: History, The- ory, Trauma (1994), Ernst van Alphen’s Caught by History: Holocaust Effects in Contemporary Art, Literature, and Theory (1997), Marianne Hirsch’s Fam- ily Frames: Photography, Narrative, and Postmemory (1997), James Young’s At Memory’s Edge: After-Images of the Holocaust in Contemporary Art and Architecture (2000), and Barbie Zelizer’s anthology Visual Culture and the Holocaust (2001), to which Apel contributed an essay that is now part of her current book. “The true horror of the Holocaust cannot be pictured,” states Apel (156), and most of the artists and writers she treats agree. How can one describe or depict what cannot be represented? And how can one save the events from oblivion, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

Memory Effects: The Holocaust and the Art of Secondary Witnessing (review)

Biography , Volume 26 (3) – Oct 30, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Biographical Research Center.
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

07-reviews (Bio 26-3) 9/4/03 8:23 AM Page 487 Reviews 487 Dora Apel. Memory Effects: The Holocaust and the Art of Secondary Witness- ing. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers UP, 2002. 241 pp. 6 color, 63 b/w illus. ISBN 0-8135-3048-2, $65.00 cloth; ISBN 0-8135-3049-0, $28.00 paper. Dora Apel’s interesting new book, Memory Effects, takes its place in a series of recent publications on the study of memory, the establishment of memo- rials, and the problem of the representation of the events of the Holocaust. These include Dominick LaCapra’s Representing the Holocaust: History, The- ory, Trauma (1994), Ernst van Alphen’s Caught by History: Holocaust Effects in Contemporary Art, Literature, and Theory (1997), Marianne Hirsch’s Fam- ily Frames: Photography, Narrative, and Postmemory (1997), James Young’s At Memory’s Edge: After-Images of the Holocaust in Contemporary Art and Architecture (2000), and Barbie Zelizer’s anthology Visual Culture and the Holocaust (2001), to which Apel contributed an essay that is now part of her current book. “The true horror of the Holocaust cannot be pictured,” states Apel (156), and most of the artists and writers she treats agree. How can one describe or depict what cannot be represented? And how can one save the events from oblivion,

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 30, 2003

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