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Maternal Deities and the Ancestry of Humanity: The Life and Photography of Higa Yasuo

Maternal Deities and the Ancestry of Humanity: The Life and Photography of Higa Yasuo T A K A R A B E N The child of Okinawan parents who emigrated to the Philippines, Higa Yasuo was born on Mindanao Island in 1938. His father was drafted into the Japanese army and died during World War II. With his mother and two siblings, he remained in the Philippines until 1946, when the family returned to Okinawa. Three years later, Higa's mother died. Raised by his grandmother in Koza City (now Okinawa City), he graduated from high school in 1958. But because his family was poor, he could not pursue his dream of going to college. Instead, he took a job with the police force and was posted at the Kadena Police Station, near the largest American military base in all of Asia. Assigned to the crime scene investigation unit--which mainly handled cases involving American servicemen--Higa learned to use a camera, and for the next ten years he worked as a forensic and documentary photographer. In 1968, while on duty at the police station, he witnessed a fully loaded B-52 bomber crash shortly after take-off on a mission to Viet Nam. The experience was a turning point in Higa's life: he decided to leave http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

Maternal Deities and the Ancestry of Humanity: The Life and Photography of Higa Yasuo

Manoa , Volume 23 (1) – Jun 29, 2011

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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Abstract

T A K A R A B E N The child of Okinawan parents who emigrated to the Philippines, Higa Yasuo was born on Mindanao Island in 1938. His father was drafted into the Japanese army and died during World War II. With his mother and two siblings, he remained in the Philippines until 1946, when the family returned to Okinawa. Three years later, Higa's mother died. Raised by his grandmother in Koza City (now Okinawa City), he graduated from high school in 1958. But because his family was poor, he could not pursue his dream of going to college. Instead, he took a job with the police force and was posted at the Kadena Police Station, near the largest American military base in all of Asia. Assigned to the crime scene investigation unit--which mainly handled cases involving American servicemen--Higa learned to use a camera, and for the next ten years he worked as a forensic and documentary photographer. In 1968, while on duty at the police station, he witnessed a fully loaded B-52 bomber crash shortly after take-off on a mission to Viet Nam. The experience was a turning point in Higa's life: he decided to leave

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 29, 2011

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