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Masao Abe: D. T. Suzuki’s Legacies and an “Academic Dharma Lineage” in North America

Masao Abe: D. T. Suzuki’s Legacies and an “Academic Dharma Lineage” in North America PANEL ON MASAO ABE Michiko Yusa Western Washington University Professor Abe is generally regarded as the torch bearer of D. T. Suzuki. But how did that come about? This essay sheds light on the relationship between Suzuki and Abe. Abe's professor, Hisamatsu Shin'ichi, had come to know Suzuki through his mentor Nishida Kitarö. Suzuki was one of Nishida's closest friends. It appears that Hisamatsu's and Suzuki's cordial relationship became closer after Nishida's death in 1945. Hisamatsu in turn was the link for Abe to come to know Suzuki. Abe recalls his first encounter with Suzuki, which took place in the winter of 1947, when Suzuki was in bed with a bad cold and Abe was sent by Hisamatsu to make a sick call on his behalf. Abe was then Hisamatsu's teaching assistant ( joshu). Seeing Suzuki in person for the first time, Abe could not help but feel the unique spiritual presence of this man. At that time, Abe, though a committed follower of Pure Land Buddhism, was deeply troubled with his spiritual quest. Perhaps sensing Abe's agony, Suzuki gave him a copy of his imperial lecture The Essence of Buddhism, in which he had treated Zen and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Masao Abe: D. T. Suzuki’s Legacies and an “Academic Dharma Lineage” in North America

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 28 (1) – Nov 14, 2008

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press
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1527-9472
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Abstract

PANEL ON MASAO ABE Michiko Yusa Western Washington University Professor Abe is generally regarded as the torch bearer of D. T. Suzuki. But how did that come about? This essay sheds light on the relationship between Suzuki and Abe. Abe's professor, Hisamatsu Shin'ichi, had come to know Suzuki through his mentor Nishida Kitarö. Suzuki was one of Nishida's closest friends. It appears that Hisamatsu's and Suzuki's cordial relationship became closer after Nishida's death in 1945. Hisamatsu in turn was the link for Abe to come to know Suzuki. Abe recalls his first encounter with Suzuki, which took place in the winter of 1947, when Suzuki was in bed with a bad cold and Abe was sent by Hisamatsu to make a sick call on his behalf. Abe was then Hisamatsu's teaching assistant ( joshu). Seeing Suzuki in person for the first time, Abe could not help but feel the unique spiritual presence of this man. At that time, Abe, though a committed follower of Pure Land Buddhism, was deeply troubled with his spiritual quest. Perhaps sensing Abe's agony, Suzuki gave him a copy of his imperial lecture The Essence of Buddhism, in which he had treated Zen and

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 14, 2008

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