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Marking Territory: Writing against Nation-based Identity in Yi Sang's "Lingering Impressions of a Mountain Village"

Marking Territory: Writing against Nation-based Identity in Yi Sang's "Lingering Impressions of a... Another Perspective John M. Frankl works since his passing, Yi Sang (1910-1937) remains something of an enigma. Best known today as a Korean modernist/experimentalist writer, Yi, née Kim Haegyng, was trained not as a writer but as an architect, and, to complicate matters, often wrote in Japanese. Thus, ironically, a significant portion of his poetic corpus--though proudly and rightfully claimed as Korean literature--is available to many Koreans only in translation.1 In addition, perhaps reflecting his architectural training, many of his poems appear more concerned with the numerical significances, geometric forms, and spatial arrangements of words on the page than with their syntactic formations. And even when one surmounts these obstacles to concentrate more fully on the words themselves, one is met by a vast 1. Nearly half--twenty-four out of fifty-six to be exact--of the Yi Sang poems contained in the most recent and authoritative anthology were originally written and published in Japanese. See Kim Chuhyn, ed., Yi Sang chnjip 1: si (The Collected Works of Yi Sang, Volume 1: Poems) (Seoul: Somyng ch'ulp'an, 2005). Among those, many were not translated into Korean until between twenty and forty years after Yi's death. However, certain more contemporary anthologies, however, seemingly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture University of Hawai'I Press

Marking Territory: Writing against Nation-based Identity in Yi Sang's "Lingering Impressions of a Mountain Village"

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 President and Fellows of Harvard College
ISSN
1944-6500
Publisher site
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Abstract

Another Perspective John M. Frankl works since his passing, Yi Sang (1910-1937) remains something of an enigma. Best known today as a Korean modernist/experimentalist writer, Yi, née Kim Haegyng, was trained not as a writer but as an architect, and, to complicate matters, often wrote in Japanese. Thus, ironically, a significant portion of his poetic corpus--though proudly and rightfully claimed as Korean literature--is available to many Koreans only in translation.1 In addition, perhaps reflecting his architectural training, many of his poems appear more concerned with the numerical significances, geometric forms, and spatial arrangements of words on the page than with their syntactic formations. And even when one surmounts these obstacles to concentrate more fully on the words themselves, one is met by a vast 1. Nearly half--twenty-four out of fifty-six to be exact--of the Yi Sang poems contained in the most recent and authoritative anthology were originally written and published in Japanese. See Kim Chuhyn, ed., Yi Sang chnjip 1: si (The Collected Works of Yi Sang, Volume 1: Poems) (Seoul: Somyng ch'ulp'an, 2005). Among those, many were not translated into Korean until between twenty and forty years after Yi's death. However, certain more contemporary anthologies, however, seemingly

Journal

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & CultureUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 28, 2008

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