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Manga Discourse in Japanese Theater: The Location of Noda Hideki's Yume no Yuminsha (review)

Manga Discourse in Japanese Theater: The Location of Noda Hideki's Yume no Yuminsha (review) "But what I really wanted to get across to everyone here including myself is that dance is nurtured by our lives, and not by techniques. To participate in these workshops I want us all to understand that dance springs from care. Anyway, let's take that as a starting point; abandon all your ideas about moving in this and that way; it doesn't matter in the slightest what you do as long as you dance with your soul" (p. 252). He exhorts the dancer to move beyond expected notions of choreography, structure, and technique. He notes, "Well, then, how should we approach the working method required to create a butoh performance? Let me put it this way: I don't want to waste our time together explaining something that I myself don't have an answer to" (p. 246). Ultimately the triumph of this text lies in its refusal to make declarative conclusions about Ohno's life and work. It rather allows the reader to play in the mystery of his image and his teaching style. Like the title of one "Workshop Words" chapter, this text both strands and frees the reader by saying simply, "Please Just Do It; There Is Nothing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Manga Discourse in Japanese Theater: The Location of Noda Hideki's Yume no Yuminsha (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 23 (2) – Aug 17, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

"But what I really wanted to get across to everyone here including myself is that dance is nurtured by our lives, and not by techniques. To participate in these workshops I want us all to understand that dance springs from care. Anyway, let's take that as a starting point; abandon all your ideas about moving in this and that way; it doesn't matter in the slightest what you do as long as you dance with your soul" (p. 252). He exhorts the dancer to move beyond expected notions of choreography, structure, and technique. He notes, "Well, then, how should we approach the working method required to create a butoh performance? Let me put it this way: I don't want to waste our time together explaining something that I myself don't have an answer to" (p. 246). Ultimately the triumph of this text lies in its refusal to make declarative conclusions about Ohno's life and work. It rather allows the reader to play in the mystery of his image and his teaching style. Like the title of one "Workshop Words" chapter, this text both strands and frees the reader by saying simply, "Please Just Do It; There Is Nothing

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 17, 2006

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