Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Maker of Dreams

Maker of Dreams B R U N O S A U R A In 1976 settled in the village of Maeva, which was the seat of ancient Mä`ohi royalty when Huahine was still called Mata`irea. For the first time in his life, he really settled down, at last finding himself in a world he'd always dreamed of, or the world of his dreams. Here, as in the legends, people take the time to live, to talk, to sing, to drink, to dance; and they love, above all, large public gatherings, particularly those of a religious nature. Bobby's religious feelings brought him close to these people. Enchanted by Polynesian culture, he was not afraid of the ancient idols of the Mäori religion but rather found them noble and dignified. Like the work of Gauguin and others, his paintings were haunted by the shadows of the night, but he chose to cast them in the light of day. A great lover of mythology, he found his own place in local history and legends, beside the ancient Mä`ohi of Tahiti, Huahine, and Ra`iätea who had immigrated, in bygone days, to Hawai`i, located far to the north of Maeva and at the summit of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

Maker of Dreams

Manoa , Volume 17 (2) – Oct 4, 2005

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/maker-of-dreams-Pj1WlO8MKX
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

B R U N O S A U R A In 1976 settled in the village of Maeva, which was the seat of ancient Mä`ohi royalty when Huahine was still called Mata`irea. For the first time in his life, he really settled down, at last finding himself in a world he'd always dreamed of, or the world of his dreams. Here, as in the legends, people take the time to live, to talk, to sing, to drink, to dance; and they love, above all, large public gatherings, particularly those of a religious nature. Bobby's religious feelings brought him close to these people. Enchanted by Polynesian culture, he was not afraid of the ancient idols of the Mäori religion but rather found them noble and dignified. Like the work of Gauguin and others, his paintings were haunted by the shadows of the night, but he chose to cast them in the light of day. A great lover of mythology, he found his own place in local history and legends, beside the ancient Mä`ohi of Tahiti, Huahine, and Ra`iätea who had immigrated, in bygone days, to Hawai`i, located far to the north of Maeva and at the summit of the

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 4, 2005

There are no references for this article.