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Maimonides' Guide for the Perplexed: Science and Salvation (review)

Maimonides' Guide for the Perplexed: Science and Salvation (review) measurement of a state's orderliness. For Confucius, ritual propriety structured with reciprocal obligation and role appropriation is the key to good governance (Analects 2.3 and 12.11). The use of physical coercion has its proper place, for both Confucius and Held (p. 166); nevertheless, it is a measure of last resort, with short-term effectiveness. And a flourishing society, for Held as well as for Confucius, needs more than a set of rights; rather it needs a sense of social cohesion characterized by trust and mutual consideration (p. 137). This prioritization of caring can have a farreaching impact not only in personal relations but also in politics and international relations, as the title of Held's book indicates. Confucian ethics emphasizes the same outward movement of care relations from the personal to the global, as has been well articulated by contemporary Confucian scholars such as Roger Ames, David Hall, and Tu Wei-ming. In sum, much like Confucianism, Held's care ethics indeed challenges the Western canonical approach, which takes autonomous male adults as the moral paradigm by giving moral weight to the practice of care in daily life, beginning at home but capable of extending to the wider public realm. The theoretical http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Maimonides' Guide for the Perplexed: Science and Salvation (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 58 (3) – Jul 16, 2008

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press
ISSN
1529-1898
Publisher site
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Abstract

measurement of a state's orderliness. For Confucius, ritual propriety structured with reciprocal obligation and role appropriation is the key to good governance (Analects 2.3 and 12.11). The use of physical coercion has its proper place, for both Confucius and Held (p. 166); nevertheless, it is a measure of last resort, with short-term effectiveness. And a flourishing society, for Held as well as for Confucius, needs more than a set of rights; rather it needs a sense of social cohesion characterized by trust and mutual consideration (p. 137). This prioritization of caring can have a farreaching impact not only in personal relations but also in politics and international relations, as the title of Held's book indicates. Confucian ethics emphasizes the same outward movement of care relations from the personal to the global, as has been well articulated by contemporary Confucian scholars such as Roger Ames, David Hall, and Tu Wei-ming. In sum, much like Confucianism, Held's care ethics indeed challenges the Western canonical approach, which takes autonomous male adults as the moral paradigm by giving moral weight to the practice of care in daily life, beginning at home but capable of extending to the wider public realm. The theoretical

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 16, 2008

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