Made in Bangladesh (review)

Made in Bangladesh (review) Review MADE IN BANGLADESH. Choreographed and Conceived by Helen Waldmann. Shilpakala Academy, Dhaka, 26 January 2015. On 24 April 2013, an eight-story commercial building, Rana Plaza, collapsed at Savar, twenty-five kilometers northeast of Dhaka. This, "the deadliest disaster in the history of the garment industry worldwide" (IGHLR 2013), was caused by structural failure and led to the death of 1,134 and injury of 2,515 garment factory workers working in five co-located factories. The workers, 80 percent of whom were women between eighteen and twenty, toiled thirteen hours a day for twelve to twenty-four cents an hour, making clothes for forty Euro-American brands, including Matalan, Primark, and Bonmarché. In this neoliberal world, where money talks, the government of Bangladesh cannot simply issue orders to remove all chances for such accidents occurring again, if only because the garment industry today accounts for nearly 80 percent of the country's export earnings and contributes 13.5 percent of its GDP (BGMEA 2015). In such given conditions, it takes a well-crafted artistic performance to reconfigure everyday facts, economic figures, and anonymous faces of the "other" into an experience of the "self" so powerfully that it scorches the skin. This performance, a seventy-minute postdramatic dance-theatre http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Made in Bangladesh (review)

Asian Theatre Journal, Volume 33 (2) – Aug 9, 2016

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Review MADE IN BANGLADESH. Choreographed and Conceived by Helen Waldmann. Shilpakala Academy, Dhaka, 26 January 2015. On 24 April 2013, an eight-story commercial building, Rana Plaza, collapsed at Savar, twenty-five kilometers northeast of Dhaka. This, "the deadliest disaster in the history of the garment industry worldwide" (IGHLR 2013), was caused by structural failure and led to the death of 1,134 and injury of 2,515 garment factory workers working in five co-located factories. The workers, 80 percent of whom were women between eighteen and twenty, toiled thirteen hours a day for twelve to twenty-four cents an hour, making clothes for forty Euro-American brands, including Matalan, Primark, and Bonmarché. In this neoliberal world, where money talks, the government of Bangladesh cannot simply issue orders to remove all chances for such accidents occurring again, if only because the garment industry today accounts for nearly 80 percent of the country's export earnings and contributes 13.5 percent of its GDP (BGMEA 2015). In such given conditions, it takes a well-crafted artistic performance to reconfigure everyday facts, economic figures, and anonymous faces of the "other" into an experience of the "self" so powerfully that it scorches the skin. This performance, a seventy-minute postdramatic dance-theatre

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 9, 2016

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