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Métamorphoses du journal personnel. De Rétif de la Bretonne à Sophie Calle (review)

Métamorphoses du journal personnel. De Rétif de la Bretonne à Sophie Calle (review) 402 Biography 30.3 (Summer 2007) Centennial celebrations in Canada and in response to a heightened awareness of their complex relationships to language, place, and culture. Dislocation and displacement are the conditions that shape the lives of many Canadians, so I expect that Saul’s approach can be mapped onto other auto/biographical work written by less well-known authors. Certainly Canada, with its history of colo- nization and immigration, with its regional divisions, with its people of many ethnicities and languages, with its shifting sense of national identity in relation to the US and within an increasingly global context, provides an excellent lo- cation from which to examine how human subjectivities are shaped by place or places. Saul makes a link between those conditions of subject formation and how individual Canadian authors use the remarkably elastic auto/biography genres in exploring and elucidating those conditions. She thereby opens up a very promising line of inquiry. works cited Buss, Helen M. Mapping Our Selves: Canadian Women’s Autobiography. Montreal: McGill- Queens UP, 1993. Egan, Susanna, and Gabriele Helms, eds. Auto/Biography. Spec. issue of Canadian Literature 172 (2002). Neuman, Shirley, ed. Reading Canadian Autobiography. Spec. issue of Essays on Canadian Writing 60 (1996). Rak, Julie, ed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

Métamorphoses du journal personnel. De Rétif de la Bretonne à Sophie Calle (review)

Biography , Volume 30 (3) – Oct 1, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Biographical Research Center.
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

402 Biography 30.3 (Summer 2007) Centennial celebrations in Canada and in response to a heightened awareness of their complex relationships to language, place, and culture. Dislocation and displacement are the conditions that shape the lives of many Canadians, so I expect that Saul’s approach can be mapped onto other auto/biographical work written by less well-known authors. Certainly Canada, with its history of colo- nization and immigration, with its regional divisions, with its people of many ethnicities and languages, with its shifting sense of national identity in relation to the US and within an increasingly global context, provides an excellent lo- cation from which to examine how human subjectivities are shaped by place or places. Saul makes a link between those conditions of subject formation and how individual Canadian authors use the remarkably elastic auto/biography genres in exploring and elucidating those conditions. She thereby opens up a very promising line of inquiry. works cited Buss, Helen M. Mapping Our Selves: Canadian Women’s Autobiography. Montreal: McGill- Queens UP, 1993. Egan, Susanna, and Gabriele Helms, eds. Auto/Biography. Spec. issue of Canadian Literature 172 (2002). Neuman, Shirley, ed. Reading Canadian Autobiography. Spec. issue of Essays on Canadian Writing 60 (1996). Rak, Julie, ed.

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2007

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