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M. Butterfly by David Henry Hwang (review)

M. Butterfly by David Henry Hwang (review) 490 PERFORMANCE REVIEWS charred bodies and Krishna frolicking with his flute and flower garlands in a lush forest. PanchaChitra, a work of Odissi dance theatre also by Dey and Akshara, is even more moving in its nuanced treatment of themes such as gender identity, self-acceptance, and women’s struggles. PanchaChitra is one of two works in the program—along with Srijan Dance Company’s Earth—adapted from texts by Indian writer Rabindranath Tagore. Whereas Kali Krishna uses verse in Sanskrit, both PanchaChitra and Earth use recorded readings of English text to accompany the choreography and help convey the more complex themes. The works PanchaChitra and Find Metiabruz! especially resonated with audiences, whose sighs of understanding were audible during both pieces. To further achieve the goal of intercultural communication and appreciation, each piece was preceded by a short verbal introduction that explained its themes and importance within a broader spectrum of Indian dance and culture. In some cases, dancers demonstrated key gestures and their meanings. All of this contributed to a program that was both rigorous and accessible and that engaged refreshingly with issues of divinity, cultural understanding, and artistic heritage in ways that achieved depth while avoiding the trite and the formulaic. EMILY http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

M. Butterfly by David Henry Hwang (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 35 (2) – Sep 14, 2018

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109

Abstract

490 PERFORMANCE REVIEWS charred bodies and Krishna frolicking with his flute and flower garlands in a lush forest. PanchaChitra, a work of Odissi dance theatre also by Dey and Akshara, is even more moving in its nuanced treatment of themes such as gender identity, self-acceptance, and women’s struggles. PanchaChitra is one of two works in the program—along with Srijan Dance Company’s Earth—adapted from texts by Indian writer Rabindranath Tagore. Whereas Kali Krishna uses verse in Sanskrit, both PanchaChitra and Earth use recorded readings of English text to accompany the choreography and help convey the more complex themes. The works PanchaChitra and Find Metiabruz! especially resonated with audiences, whose sighs of understanding were audible during both pieces. To further achieve the goal of intercultural communication and appreciation, each piece was preceded by a short verbal introduction that explained its themes and importance within a broader spectrum of Indian dance and culture. In some cases, dancers demonstrated key gestures and their meanings. All of this contributed to a program that was both rigorous and accessible and that engaged refreshingly with issues of divinity, cultural understanding, and artistic heritage in ways that achieved depth while avoiding the trite and the formulaic. EMILY

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 14, 2018

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