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Living Dangerously in Korea: The Western Experience 1900-1950 (review)

Living Dangerously in Korea: The Western Experience 1900-1950 (review) book reviews Living Dangerously in Korea: The Western Experience 1900­1950, by Donald N. Clark. Norwalk, Connecticut: EastBridge, 2003. xiv, 455 pp. Photos, maps, bibliography, index. $24.95 paper. As a son and grandson of Presbyterian missionaries who spent his formative years in Korea, Donald Clark is well-situated to tell his story: the Western missionary experience in Korea through the first half of the twentieth century. With this in mind, it first bears noting that Clark's formidable work of scholarship is both more and less than its title implies. Living Dangerously in Korea concerns itself primarily with the experiences of Western, that is, American, Protestant missionaries rather than the much more general category of Westerners in Korea. In doing so, however, Clark offers new scholarship and insights into Korea's initial fifty-year journey into the twentieth century, from the final years of the Chos0n dynasty up to national division, but a period spent primarily under Japanese colonial occupation. Clark sets forth early on that his approach is dual in nature--part scholarly and part personal: "While doing all the typical academic things I have wanted to pursue a more personal study--to learn what my family and the people whom we knew contributed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Korean Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Living Dangerously in Korea: The Western Experience 1900-1950 (review)

Korean Studies , Volume 28 (1) – Nov 7, 2004

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1529
Publisher site
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Abstract

book reviews Living Dangerously in Korea: The Western Experience 1900­1950, by Donald N. Clark. Norwalk, Connecticut: EastBridge, 2003. xiv, 455 pp. Photos, maps, bibliography, index. $24.95 paper. As a son and grandson of Presbyterian missionaries who spent his formative years in Korea, Donald Clark is well-situated to tell his story: the Western missionary experience in Korea through the first half of the twentieth century. With this in mind, it first bears noting that Clark's formidable work of scholarship is both more and less than its title implies. Living Dangerously in Korea concerns itself primarily with the experiences of Western, that is, American, Protestant missionaries rather than the much more general category of Westerners in Korea. In doing so, however, Clark offers new scholarship and insights into Korea's initial fifty-year journey into the twentieth century, from the final years of the Chos0n dynasty up to national division, but a period spent primarily under Japanese colonial occupation. Clark sets forth early on that his approach is dual in nature--part scholarly and part personal: "While doing all the typical academic things I have wanted to pursue a more personal study--to learn what my family and the people whom we knew contributed

Journal

Korean StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 7, 2004

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