Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Liquid Vocalization and Loss in Central Vanuatu

Liquid Vocalization and Loss in Central Vanuatu A number of languages in central Vanuatu show merger of Proto-Oceanic *l and *r, but also show a split in the merged phoneme. Although reflected as a liquid in certain environments, especially before or adjacent to a high vowel and also word-initially, *l and *r are also reflected as <i>i</i>, zero, or zero accompanied by fronting and raising of one of the adjacent vowels in the neighborhood of nonhigh vowels. The languages that show this context-sensitive vocalization and loss are geographically fairly contiguous, being spoken in southeast Malakula, Paama, and Epi, but belong to different genetic subgroups of Central Vanuatu. This paper attempts to explain these facts in their historical context. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

Liquid Vocalization and Loss in Central Vanuatu

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 47 (2) – Jan 24, 2009

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/liquid-vocalization-and-loss-in-central-vanuatu-R02Dhymmzh
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9421

Abstract

A number of languages in central Vanuatu show merger of Proto-Oceanic *l and *r, but also show a split in the merged phoneme. Although reflected as a liquid in certain environments, especially before or adjacent to a high vowel and also word-initially, *l and *r are also reflected as <i>i</i>, zero, or zero accompanied by fronting and raising of one of the adjacent vowels in the neighborhood of nonhigh vowels. The languages that show this context-sensitive vocalization and loss are geographically fairly contiguous, being spoken in southeast Malakula, Paama, and Epi, but belong to different genetic subgroups of Central Vanuatu. This paper attempts to explain these facts in their historical context.

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 24, 2009

There are no references for this article.