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Liberation Theology and Engaged Buddhism: Challenging Each Other, Learning from Each Other

Liberation Theology and Engaged Buddhism: Challenging Each Other, Learning from Each Other Liberation Theology and Engaged Buddhism: Challenging Each Other, Learning from Each Other1 Paul F. Knitter Union Theological Seminary, Emeritus As John Makransky made clear when he was organizing this panel, our hopes are to carry on and deepen the conversations that a number of us were part of at the international conference at Union Theological Seminary in April 2013, "Enlightenment and Liberation: Engaged Buddhists and Liberation Theologians in Dialogue."2 My contributions to this continuing conversation come primarily out of my Christian background--though I have been a practicing Buddhist-Christian (a "double-belonger") for over three decades. So my primary concern will be what Christians might learn from Buddhists. Also, I'll be speaking as a so-called progressive Roman Catholic theologian and as a student and practitioner of Tibetan Buddhism. Those are the traditions and the communities I will try to speak for and to. To structure and enliven the conversation between Christians and Buddhists about what they might learn from each other in their shared commitment to do something about the sufferings that afflict our planet and its inhabitants, I have built my reflections around what I believe are four progressively interconnecting questions: (1) What is really going on in this http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Liberation Theology and Engaged Buddhism: Challenging Each Other, Learning from Each Other

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 36 – Oct 10, 2016

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
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Abstract

Liberation Theology and Engaged Buddhism: Challenging Each Other, Learning from Each Other1 Paul F. Knitter Union Theological Seminary, Emeritus As John Makransky made clear when he was organizing this panel, our hopes are to carry on and deepen the conversations that a number of us were part of at the international conference at Union Theological Seminary in April 2013, "Enlightenment and Liberation: Engaged Buddhists and Liberation Theologians in Dialogue."2 My contributions to this continuing conversation come primarily out of my Christian background--though I have been a practicing Buddhist-Christian (a "double-belonger") for over three decades. So my primary concern will be what Christians might learn from Buddhists. Also, I'll be speaking as a so-called progressive Roman Catholic theologian and as a student and practitioner of Tibetan Buddhism. Those are the traditions and the communities I will try to speak for and to. To structure and enliven the conversation between Christians and Buddhists about what they might learn from each other in their shared commitment to do something about the sufferings that afflict our planet and its inhabitants, I have built my reflections around what I believe are four progressively interconnecting questions: (1) What is really going on in this

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 10, 2016

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